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Cornell University 

Announcements 




Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences 
1981-1982 



Digitized by 


the Internet Archive 






in 2013 







http://archive.org/details/cornelluniversit1981corn_0 



Cornell University 
Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences 



1300 York Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 

Telephone 212/472-5670 



1981-82 



1981-82 



Calendar 



Fall Semester 

Registration 

Orientation, 9:00 a.m. 

Instruction begins for first trimester and 

fall semester 
Labor Day holiday 
End of first trimester 
Examinations for first trimester 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction begins for second trimester 
Winter recess: 

Instruction suspended, 5:00 p.m. 

Instruction resumed, 9:00 a.m. 
Last day for completing all requirements 

for January degrees 
Examinations for first semester 
Fall semester ends 

Spring Semester 

Registration 

Instruction begins for spring semester 
Washington's Birthday 
End of second trimester 
Examinations for second trimester 
Instruction begins for third trimester 
Spring recess: 

Instruction suspended, 5:00 p.m. 

Instruction resumed, 9:00 a.m 
Last day for completing requirements for 

May degree 
Commencement, 3:00 p.m. 
End of third trimester and spring semester 
Memorial Day holiday 
Examinations for third trimester and 

spring semester 



Monday, August 31-Tuesday, September 1 
Tuesday, September 1 

Wednesday, September 2 
Monday, September 7 
Wednesday, November 18 
Thursday, November 19-Wednesday, 

November 25 
Thursday, November 26 and 

Friday, November 27 
Monday, November 30 

Friday, December 18 
Monday, January 4, 1982 

Friday, January 8 

Monday, January 18-Friday, January 22 
Friday, January 22 



Monday, January 25 

Monday, January 25 

Monday, February 15 

Friday, February 19 

Monday, February 22-Friday, March 5 

Monday, March 8 

Friday, April 16 
Monday, April 26 

Friday, May 7 
Wednesday, May 26 
Friday, May 28 
Monday, May 31 

Monday, June 1-Friday, June 4 



Summer 

Registration for summer research Monday, June 7 

Summer research period begins Monday, June 7 

Last day for completing all requirements 

for August degrees Friday, August 13 

Summer research period ends Friday, August 18 

Note: Courses in the Graduate School of Medical Sciences are either semestral or trimestral. 
The calendar for this school is based primarily on the academic semester but is coordinated as 
well with the trimestral calendar of the Medical College. The dates shown in the calendar are 
subject to change at any time by official action of Cornell University. 

In enacting this calendar, the Graduate School of Medical Sciences has scheduled classes on 
religious holidays. It is the intent of the school that students missing classes due to the obser- 
vance of religious holidays be given ample opportunity to make up work. 



Announcement 



Contents 



2 Calendar 

5 Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

5 Purpose and History 

5 Facilities 

5 Organization of the Graduate School 

6 Admission 

7 Degree Requirements 
9 Tuition and Fees 

10 Financial Assistance 

10 Scholarships and Awards 

11 Loans 

11 Student Health Services 

12 Residence Halls 

13 Fields of Instruction 

13 Instruction at the Medical College Division 

25 Instruction at the Sloan-Kettering Division 

35 Interdivisional Courses 

36 Special Programs 
38 Register 

50 Aerial View of Buildings 

52 Index 

52 List of Announcements 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel 
listed herein, are as of July 1, 1981 and 
are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 




The New York Hospital — Cornell Medical Center 



Cornell University 



Graduate School of Medical Sciences 



Purpose and History 

The Graduate School of Medical Sciences, a 
semi-autonomous component of the Graduate 
School of Cornell University, provides an en- 
vironment for advanced study and research in 
specific areas of the basic biomedical sciences. 
Graduate programs leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy are currently offered in the 
Fields of Biochemistry, Biological Structure and 
Cell Biology, Biology, Biomathematics, Bio- 
physics, Biostatistics, Genetics, Immunology, 
Microbiology, Neurobiology and Behavior, Pa- 
thology, Pharmacology, and Physiology. Certain 
of these graduate fields also offer programs 
leading to the degree of Maste, of Science. The 
faculty recommends the award of advanced 
general degrees not only as the result of the 
fulfillment of certain formal academic require- 
ments, but also as evidence of the development 
and possession of a critical and creative ability 
in Science. Proof of this ability is embodied in a 
dissertation which thii candidate presents to the 
faculty as an original research contribution in 
the area of study. 

Freedom and independence are key qualities of 
scholarship, and graduate education at Cornell 
attempts to preserve them for teacher and stu- 
dent. Each graduate student is supervised by his 
or her own Special Committee, a small group of 
faculty members selected by the student. Within 
the broad framework of requirements for resi- 
dence, examinations, and thesis, and additional 
regulations of individual fields, the Cornell grad- 
uate student and this Special Committee are 
completely free to plan a program of study. The 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences sets no 
overall course, credit-hour, or grade require- 
ments. The Special Committee has extraordinary 
independence in guiding the student's program, 
and a student will be recommended for a degree 
whenever this committee judges the student 
qualified. 

The opportunity for graduate study leading to 
advanced general degrees in the biomedical 
sciences was first offered at the Cornell Univer- 
sity Medical College in 1912 in cooperation with 
the Graduate School of Cornell University. In 
June of 1950, Cornell University, in association 
with the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer 



Research, established a new division of the 
Medical College, the Sloan-Kettering Division, 
for the purpose of providing additional opportu- 
nities for graduate study in the biomedical 
sciences. The resultant expansion of the grad- 
uate faculty and facilities on the New York City 
campus prompted the organization in January 
1952 of the Graduate School of Medical Sci- 
ences, which has full responsibility for advanced 
general degrees granted for study in residence 
at the New York City campus. 

Facilities 

The Medical College Division. The buildings of 
the Medical College extend along York Avenue 
from Sixty-eighth to Seventieth Streets. They 
contain the main library, lecture rooms, and 
study laboratories for the basic science depart- 
ments, and extensive research facilities for 
faculty and students. 

The Sloan-Kettering Division. The facilities of 
the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Re- 
search consist of the Howard Laboratory and 
the Kettering Laboratory on East Sixty-eighth 
Street in New York City and the Walker Labora- 
tory in Rye, New York. These provide lecture and 
seminar rooms and well-equipped laboratories 
for biomedical research. 

Organization 

Faculty 

The Graduate School of Medical Sciences is 
composed of two relatively separate divisions: 
the Medical College Division, consisting pri- 
marily of the professional staff of the basic 
science departments of the Cornell University 
Medical College; and the Sloan-Kettering Divi- 
sion, consisting of the professional staff of the 
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. 
Within each of these divisions are fields or units 
of graduate instruction formed by faculty mem- 
bers with similar research and teaching inter- 
ests. An individual faculty member may elect to 
affiliate with the one or two fields or units in 
which he or she agrees to sponsor graduate 
students. 



6 Admission 



General Committee 

The General Committee of the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences is an administrative board 
whose membership has responsibility for the 
academic affairs of the school. The committee 
considers matters referred to it by members of 
the faculty and offers recommendations to the 
faculty on questions involving the interests or 
policies of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences. 

The General Committee is composed of the dean 
and the associate dean of the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences, the associate director of 
the Sloan-Kettering Division, one elected repre- 
sentative from each of the fields of the Medical 
College Division and from each of the units of 
the Sloan-Kettering Division, and two student 
representatives elected by the graduate student 
body. The General Committee approves new 
fields, reviews the admission of students, ap- 
proves students' major and minor fields, reviews 
the curriculum of each field, reviews the require- 
ments for degrees, and acts on faculty and 
student petitions. 

The chairperson of the General Committee is the 
dean, who is the academic administrative officer 
of the Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
and is also an associate dean of the Graduate 
School of Cornell University. The secretary of the 
General Committee is the associate dean, who 
is also an assistant dean of the Graduate School 
of Cornell University. 

Admission 
Applications 

For admission to the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences an applicant must (1) have a bac- 
calaureate degree or the equivalent from a 
college or university of recognized standing, 
(2) have adequate preparation in the chosen 
field of study, and (3) show promise of ability 
to pursue advanced study and research, as 
judged by his or her previous record. 

Inquiries about graduate study should be ad- 
dressed to the Dean of the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences, 1300 York Avenue, New York, 
New York 10021 or to the Associate Director of 
the Sloan-Kettering Division, 1275 York Avenue, 
New York, New York 10021. 

Candidates may be admitted in September. 
February, or July, although places in the gradu- 
ate program for February and July may not be 
available because of prior commitments to ap- 
plicants for September admission. Applicants for 
February or July admission should correspond 
directly with the respective field representatives 
in the Medical College Division or the unit chair- 
person of the Sloan-Kettering Division regarding 
the availability of places. 

Application material must be completed and re- 
turned to the Office of the Dean together with 



(1) official transcripts of records from all colleges 
and universities attended, (2) a statement of 
purpose of graduate study, and (3) two letters of 
recommendation from individuals in academic 
positions who know the applicant professionally. 
In addition, scores from the Graduate Record 
Examinations are usually required by individual 
fields to aid in their evaluation. 

Applications for September or July admission 
and all credentials, including official transcripts 
of records from all colleges and universities 
attended, must be received by the deadline date 
of February 1. 

Applications and credentials for February ad- 
mission must be received by November 1. 

Application fee. A nonrefundable charge of $25 
is made for filing an application for admission. 

The completed application and all supporting 
documents are reviewed by the Field (or Division) 
Credentials Committee. Applicants who are con- 
sidered potentially acceptable are usually called 
for a personal interview. At the time of inter- 
view, after discussing his or her interests with 
the members of the field, the applicant may 
tentatively select a major sponsor. If accepted 
by the field, an application is returned to the 
dean who may refer it to the General Committee 
for final review and decision. A student is for- 
mally notified of acceptance for study in the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences by a letter 
from the dean. An applicant accepted for ad- 
mission is requested to inform the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences of her or his plan 
to either accept or refuse the offer of admission 
within one month after the dean's acceptance 
letter has been received. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to 
support equality of educational and employment 
opportunity. No person shall be denied admis- 
sion to any educational program or activity or be 
denied employment on the basis of any legally 
prohibited discrimination involving, but not 
limited to, such factors as race, color, creed, 
religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or 
handicap. The University is committed to the 
maintenance of affirmative action programs 
which will assure the continuation of such 
equality of opportunity. 

Admission policies are also in conformity with 
the policy of New York State in regard to the 
American ideal of equality of opportunity as em- 
bodied in the Education Practices Act. 

Categories 

An applicant is accepted by the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences (1) as a degree candidate 
for the M.S. or Ph.D., or (2) as a provisional 
candidate. 

Provisional candidacy provides opportunity for 
a prospective degree candidate, whose educa- 
tional preparation is difficult to evaluate, to be- 
gin graduate studies. On the basis of the record 



Degree Requirements 7 



of accomplishment in the first half of the aca- 
demic year, the adviser or temporary Special 
Committee of a provisional candidate may rec- 
ommend to the dean that (1) provisional candi- 
dacy be changed to degree candidacy, (2) 
provisional candidacy be continued for the re- 
mainder of the academic year, or (3) provisional 
candidacy be terminated. A maximum of one 
academic year in the status of provisional can- 
didacy is permitted and credit of a maximum of 
one residence unit may be allowed on petition, 
provided there is convincing evidence that per- 
formance has been of the same quality as that 
required of degree candidates. 

Special Students 

Special students are those students who are not 
degree candidates in either the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences or the Medical College and 
who are given permission by the respective dean 
to take courses at either school. Special stu- 
dents must be degree candidates at other 
institutions and the courses taken at Cornell 
must be essential to their degree programs and 
are not offered by the institutions at which they 
are matriculated as degree candidates as cer- 
tified by the institutions. Enrolment as a special 
student is not intended as preparation for 
admission to degree programs at Cornell or 
elsewhere. 

In the case of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences, special students are accepted only 
with the approval of the appropriate Field Repre- 
sentative in the Med. al College Division or of 
the appropriate Chairperson in the Sloan-Ketter- 
ing Division, or in the case of the Medical 
College with the approval of the departmental 
head. Special students must demonstrate special 
qualifications in terms of preparation and ability. 
They must register with the appropriate office 
in the Graduate School of Medical Sciences or 
in the Medical College and must pay all tuition 
and fees before being permitted to attend lec- 
tures or laboratory sessions. Tuition is computed 
on the basis of the ratio of course hours taken 
to the total hours of instruction for the academic 
year (33 40-hour weeks). There is a registration 
fee of $25. 



Degree Requirements 
Major and Minor Fields 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Science 
is required to register for study in one major 
and one minor field. Each field decides whether 
the Special Committee of a candidate for the 
Ph.D. degree must have two or three fields rep- 
resented. Accordingly, a candidate for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required to 
register for study in one major and one or two 
minor fields. At least one of the minors must be 
outside the area of the major field. 



The Special Committee 

The general degree requirements of the Grad- 
uate School of Medical Sciences are minimal in 
order to give maximum flexibility in choosing a 
desirable program of study. The student's pro- 
gram is determined with the aid and direction of 
a Special Committee, consisting of at least three 
faculty members chosen by the student from 
those fields that best fit his or her areas of inter- 
est. Satisfactory progress toward a degree is 
judged by the committee rather than by arbitrary 
standards imposed by the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences. There are no regulations of 
the Faculty of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences governing the specific content of 
instruction, courses, or grades to which the 
Special Committee must subscribe, except those 
imposed by the fields. The committee is pri- 
marily responsible for the candidate's develop- 
ment as an independent scholar and scientist. 

No later than four weeks after enrollment, a 
candidate must file a statement of the major and 
minor fields selected for study, after which the 
student must choose one faculty member to 
represent each field and to serve on a Special 
Committee. The faculty member representing 
the major field usually advises the student con- 
cerning the other selections and chairs the 
committee. At least one member of the commit- 
tee must represent a field different from the 
candidate's major field. Members may agree to 
serve temporarily during the candidate's first 
year of residence until the candidate has had 
the opportunity to become acquainted with 
areas of research in the fields of his or her 
choice. On completion of this year of residence, 
a permanent Special Committee will be formed, 
the membership of which can be changed with 
agreement of all members of the old and newly 
formed committees and the approval of the 
dean. The members of the Special Committee 
decide on the student's program of study and 
research, and judge whether progress toward a 
degree is satisfactory. After consulting the other 
members, the chairperson of the Special Com- 
mittee prepares term reports on the candidate 
for submission to the dean. The members of the 
committee serve on all the candidate's ex- 
amining committees and they approve his or 
her thesis. 

Registration and Course Grades 

No student in the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences may double-register for an advanced 
general or professional degree with any other 
school or college except the Cornell University 
Medical College. 

At the beginning of each term, students are 
required to register with the Office of the Grad- 
uate School of Medical Sciences and to file a 
registration of courses form indicating all 
courses they will take. A fee of $10 is charged 
for late registration. 



8 Degree Requirements 



At the beginning of each course in which the 
student is enrolling, the student will complete a 
separate course registration form for the in- 
structor. All courses for which the student 
registers for credit will be entered in the official 
record. Grades of graduate students are re- 
ported as: Excellent (E), Satisfactory (S), Un- 
satisfactory (U), Incomplete (I), Absent (Abs.), or 
Unofficially Withdrawn (W). A grade of Incom- 
plete or Absent cannot be changed later than 
one term following the one in which the course 
was taken. 

Registration for the summer is required of those 
graduate students who will be engaged in 
research. 

Residence 

The faculty of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences regards study in residence as essen- 
tial. Each candidate for an advanced general 
degree is expected to complete the residence 
requirements with reasonable continuity. A stu- 
dent must register each term from the time of 
his or her first registration in the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences until the student 
either withdraws or completes a degree (unless 
a leave of absence has been granted). Full-time 
study for one-half academic year with satisfac- 
tory accomplishment constitutes one residence 
unit. Two units of residence are the minimal 
requirement for the master's degree and six 
units are the minimum for the doctoral degree. 
However, the time necessary to obtain the de- 
gree generally exceeds the minimal require- 
ments. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must 
spend two of the last four units of required 
residence in successive terms on the New York 
City or the Ithaca campus of Cornell University. 
No more than seven years may intervene be- 
tween the time of first registration and the 
completion of all requirements for the doctoral 
degree. A student must complete all require- 
ments for the master's degree in four years. 

Part-time graduate study, if it is necessitated by 
off-campus employment noncontributory to the 
major field of study, is not encouraged. Re- 
quests for part-time study must be reviewed by 
the General Committee. If permission is granted 
for part-time study, the student must be in 
residence at least half-time. 

Transfer of Residence Credit 

No residence credit will be granted for study 
outside the Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
to fulfill the requirements of the M.S. degree. 
No commitment can be made about granting 
residence credit toward the Ph.D. requirements 
for previous study in another graduate school un- 
til after the candidate has entered into residence 
at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences. 
At that time, the student's Special Committee 
may recommend acceptance of study outside 



The legislation with respect to eligibility of part- 
time students for residence units is as follows: 



Employment Residence Units Allowable Per 
Half Academic Year 



Total clock 


Contrib- 


Noncon- 


Off 


hours per 


utory in 


tributory; 


campus 


week 


major field; 


on campus 






on campus 






0-10 hrs. 


1 unit 


1 unit 


% unit 


11-20 hrs. 


1 unit 


% unit 


% unit 


21-30 hrs. 


% unit 


Vz unit 





(teaching) 
3/4-1 unit 
(research)* 



* Time spent assisting in research, if it is con- 
tributory to the major field of study, shall be 
credited toward allowance of a full residence 
unit. 



the Graduate School of Medical Sciences to the 
General Committee, which will determine the 
number of residence units to be awarded. No 
credit can be transferred for study undertaken 
as an undergraduate or as a special student even 
in courses designed for graduate students. 

A student who has satisfactorily completed two 
or more academic years of study toward the 
degree of M.D. at the Cornell University Medical 
College, or another accredited medical school 
in the United States with a curriculum equivalent 
to that of the Cornell University Medical College, 
may transfer a maximum of two units of resi- 
dence credit after passing an evaluation exami- 
nation administered by a committee appointed 
by the General Committee of the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences. 

Summer Research 

Registration is required for the summer research 
period whether or not this effort will be credited 
toward residence unit accumulation. Students 
registered for summer research pay prorated 
tuition only if they are obtaining residence credit. 
However, no degree candidate is eligible for 
more than two residence units in any period of 
twelve consecutive months. 

Study In Absentia 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy may petition for permission to earn resi- 
dence units for study away from Cornell Univer- 
sity while regularly registered in the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences. A candidate to 
whom this privilege has been granted may work 
temporarily under the immediate supervision of 
an individual designated by his or her Special 
Committee, but the candidate's program will 
continue to be directed by the committee. For 
study In absentia, not more than two residence 
units may be earned toward fulfillment of the 
minimal residence requirements for the Ph.D. 



Tuition and Fees 9 



degree. A student given leave for such study 
must register as a candidate In absentia and pay 
a fee of $200 per semester, and may continue his 
or her hospitalization insurance by payment of 
the annual premium directly to the Student 
Accounting Office of Cornell University Medical 
College. If students in absentia take advantage 
of local privileges, such as the use of the library, 
desk space, Student Health Service, hospi- 
talization insurance, and Cornell housing, the 
fee is $400 per semester. 

Leave of Absence 

A candidate who finds it necessary to interrupt 
the continuity of his or her residence must peti- 
tion the Dean for an official leave of absence. 
This written petition must specify the term of 
absence, state the reason for the requested 
leave of absence, and be approved by the stu- 
dent's Special Committee. 

A student who will nor be in residence but will 
return to the Graduate School of Medical Sci- 
ences to present and defend a the: at the final 
examination, having completed a" jquirements 
for a degree except for the final examination, 
must petition for a leave of absence. On return 
to the Graduate School of Meaical Sciences for 
the final examination, the candidate will register 
as a Candidate for Degree Only and will pay a 
fee of $35. 

Examinations 

Three examinations ive required by the Faculty 
of the Graduate School of Medical Sciences: 
(1) final examination for the M.S. degree, (2) 
examination for admission to doctoral candidacy, 
and (3) final examination for ihe Ph.D. degree. 
Examinations are administered by an Examining 
Committee consisting of a chairperson appointed 
by the dean, the members of the candidate's 
Special Committee, and, in the case of the Ad- 
mission to Candidacy Examination, three addi- 
tional members selected from the faculty of the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences and/or of 
other institutions. In addition to these examina- 
tions, the candidate's major field may require 
a qualifying examination as part of its evaluation 
of the candidate after two units of residence 
have been completed. 

For the M.S. degree: the final examination may 
be oral or both oral and written. 

For the Ph.D. degree: the Admission to Candi- 
dacy Examination is both oral and written and 
certifies that the student is eligible to present a 
thesis to the Faculty of the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences. The examination should be 
taken after course work is largely finished but 
before significant thesis research has begun. 
Accordingly, the usual examination time will be 
at the end of the second year of residence. The 
examination may not be taken until two units 
of residence credit have been accumulated and 
a minimum of two units of residence credit is 



required after passing this examination before 
the final examination can be scheduled. The final 
examination for the Ph.D. degree is an oral de- 
fense of the candidate's thesis. It must be passed 
within four years after completion of the re- 
quired residence units, or within seven years 
from the date of first registration, whichever is 
earlier. 

Foreign Language Requirements 

Each field of study has its own foreign language 
requirements. The student's Special Committee 
may require knowledge of foreign languages 
beyond the requirements of the fields listed in 
this Announcement. 

Arrangements for a foreign language examina- 
tion will be made on application to the Office of 
the Dean. As an alternative to this examination, 
the candidate may demonstrate proficiency by 
having passed the reading part of the language 
qualification tests administered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. 

Theses 

A principal requirement for both the M.S. and 
the Ph.D. degrees is the presentation of a thesis 
constituting an imaginative contribution to 
knowledge. Ordinarily, the thesis is written on a 
research topic in the candidate's major field of 
study, under the direction of the chairperson of 
his or her Special Committee. The faculty re- 
quires that the Ph.D. thesis be published in ab- 
stract and be recorded on microfilm. 

Tuition and Fees 
Tuition 

Tuition for a student regularly matriculated in 
the Graduate School of Medical Sciences is 
$6325 for the academic year 1981-82 and is pay- 
able in two equal parts, the first of which is due 
at initial registration. Tuition includes fees for 
matriculation, hospitalization insurance, gradua- 
tion, and miscellaneous thesis expenses. 

For graduate students who (1) have been in con- 
tinuous residence at Cornell in the same doctoral 
program and have passed their Admission to 
Candidacy Examination and (2) are not taking 
courses in the Medical College curriculum, a 
reduced charge of $1600 per annum ($800 per 
semester) will be made for tuition and fees for 
the terms subsequent to the Admission to Can- 
didacy Examination. For those students who are 
accepted into the Ph.D.-M.D. Program (see p. 36 ) 
and will continue to take courses in the medical 
curriculum, an additional tuition charge, based 
on the Medical College tuition ($9,000 per an- 
num), will be made for the medical course hours 
taken. 

Other Fees 

In Absentia A graduate student registered in 



10 Scholarships and Awards 



absentia pays a fee of $200 each term. If stu- 
dents in absentia take advantage of local privi- 
leges, such as the use of the library, desk space. 
Student Health Service, hospitalization insur- 
ance, and Cornell housing, the fee is $400 per 
semester. 

Active-File Fee Doctoral graduate students 
filing leaves of absence will be required to pay 
an active-file fee of $200 for each semester, up 
to a maximum of six semesters ($1,200), during 
which they are not registered with the Graduate 
School. This fee will not be subject to finance 
charges but must be paid before the student can 
receive an advanced degree. Petition for waiver 
of this fee will be considered for students who 
have not completed residence units. Beginning 
September 1981, doctoral candidates who are 
paying reduced tuition (see p. 9) will also be 
required to pay the active-file fee. 

Candidate for Degree Only A graduate student 
who returns to the University to present a thesis 
and to take the final examination for an ad- 
vanced degree, all the work for that degree hav- 
ing been previously completed, must register 
as a Candidate for Degree Only and pay a fee 
of $35 unless the student has paid the active-file 
fee during the semester in which the final exami- 
nation is taken. 

A graduate student who has previously fulfilled 
all other degree requirements, who has been 
granted a leave of absence, and who returns to 
the Graduate School of Medical Sciences to 
present a thesis and to take the final examina- 
tion must register as a Candidate for Degree 
Only and pay a fee of $35. 

A student who is to receive partial residence 
credit (see p. 8) because of employment should 
apply for proration of tuition on forms obtainable 
at the Office of the Dean. Proration of tuition 
does not apply to the special reduced tuition of 
$800 per semester. 

Any individual who owes money to the University 
will not be allowed to register or reregister in 
the University, receive a transcript of his or her 
record, have his or her academic credits certi- 
fied, be granted a leave of absence, or have a 
degree conferred. 

The amount, time, and manner of payment of 
tuition, fees, or other charges may be changed 
at any time without notice. 

Refunds 

Part of the amount personally paid for tuition 
will be refunded if the student obtains official 
certification of leave of absence or withdrawal 
from the Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
during the semester. Students who terminate 
their registration during a regular term in this 
manner will be charged tuition from the regis- 
tration day to the effective date of the certificate 
as follows: first week, 10 percent; second week, 
20 percent; third week, 30 percent; fourth week, 
40 percent; fifth week, 60 percent; sixth week 



80 percent; seventh week, 100 percent. No 
charge will be made if the effective date of leave 
or withdrawal is within the first six days of the 
term, including registration day. 

Financial Assistance 

All applicants to the Graduate School are re- 
quested to submit a Graduate and Professional 
School Financial Aid Service (GAPSFAS) form 
providing an estimate of financial need. The in- 
formation will be used in two ways: the number 
of students with documentable need will allow 
the University to obtain maximum federal funding 
for loans and work-study purposes, and the 
specific need of an applicant may be used to 
determine that individual's graduate support. 
Please obtain the necessary form, available at 
your college or university financial aid office 
and from the Educational Testing Service. File 
the form with the Educational Testing Service, 
Box 2614, Princeton, New Jersey 08541, and re- 
quest that the information be sent to Cornell — 
Code 2098. 

Financial assistance is available to qualified 
applicants. Individual fields or units may offer 
predoctoral research fellowships, research as- 
sistantships, or teaching assistantships. These 
positions may provide a stipend in addition to 
tuition. Information about these positions may 
be obtained directly from the field or unit at the 
time of application. 

Nationwide, competitive, predoctoral fellowships 
are available from the National Science Founda- 
tion and the National Research Council. Infor- 
mation about these fellowships should be re- 
quested directly from the appropriate govern- 
mental agency. 

New York State residents are eligible for several 
predoctoral fellowships and for the Tuition As- 
sistance Program, which assists in tuition pay- 
ments. Application forms may be obtained from 
the New York Higher Education Services Cor- 
poration. Student Financial Aid Section, Tower 
Building, Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 
12255. 

Opportunity for part-time employment is often 
available in departmental research projects or 
other activities. Applications should be made 
directly to individual departments. The Gradu- 
ate School of Medical Sciences participates in 
the Work-Study Program of Cornell University. 

Scholarships and Awards 

Graduate School Scholarships. The Office of 
the Dean of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences administers tuition scholarships to 
students in the Medical College Division from 
funds generously made available by the Dean of 
the Medical College. The award of these tuition 
scholarships is made on the recommendations of 
the Field Representatives in the Medical College 
Division. Tuition scholarships and fellowships 



Student Health Services 11 



are available to graduate students in the Sloan- 
Kettering Division through the Office of the 
Associate Director of the Sloan-Kettering 
Division. 

The Vincent Astor Scholarship Fund. Funds for 
limited tuition assistance are also derived from 
the income from a generous gift by the Vincent 
Astor Foundation to the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences and to the Medical College. 
Allocation of these funds for graduate student 
tuition assistance is made at the discretion of 
the Dean of the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences on the recommendations of the Field 
Representatives in the Medical College Division 
and of the Associate Director of the Sloan- 
Kettering Division. 

The Lois and Max Beren Foundation may award 
a scholarship to a promising student accepted 
for admission at Cornell University Medical 
College in an amount to be determined by con- 
sultation between the college and the founda- 
tion. The student shall be selected by the 
college, subject to the approval of the founda- 
tion, and may be a candidate for either the Ph.D. 
or M.D. degree. It is the desire of the foundation 
to assist a student who possesses a great eager- 
ness to pursue studies but who would find it 
impossible or impractical to do so without the 
financial support of the foundation. 

The Elizabeth C. Lowry Scholarship Fund was 

endowed by Dr. Low;y, a member of the class of 
1935, in memory of her late husband, Dr. 
Thomas Lowry, who was also a member of that 
class. The income is to be used to provide 
financial assistance to womrn students in the 
Medical College. If, in any year, there is no 
woman student in need of such assistance, the 
income available may be awarded to a woman 
candidate for a Ph.D. in the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences. 

The Frank R. and Blanche A. Mowrer Memorial 
Fund. Limited financial assistance is available 
from the income of this fund to one student per 
year enrolled in the Ph.D.-M.D. or M.D. -Ph.D. 
program. 

Training in Psychiatry Fund. A grateful patient, 
recognizing the value of psychiatric therapy in 
helping people achieve a more normal, fruitful 
life has established this fund to provide finan- 
cial assistance to students preparing for a 
career in psychiatry. Students who seriously 
intend to enter the field of psychiatry and who 
are judged qualified by the faculty, are eligible 
for financial aid after the second year of the 
medical course. Financial assistance may also 
be given in support of graduate or postgraduate 
training in the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 

The Frank Lappin Horsfall Jr. Award is endowed 



by funds provided in memory of Dr. Horsfall by 
his many friends and family. It is continued 
evidence of his concern for students manifest 
during his directorship of the Sloan-Kettering 
Division. 

The award is available annually to a student of 
the Sloan-Kettering Division, who in the opinion 
of the Committee of the Faculty of the Sloan- 
Kettering Division, has been most distinguished, 
especially in the Admission to Doctoral Can- 
didacy Examination. 

Loans 

Several loan programs are available to graduate 
students. Under these programs, repayment of 
the principal amount of the loan together with 
ihe interest on the loan may be deferred until 
after graduation. Complete information regard- 
ing loan programs may be obtained from the 
Office of Financial Aid, Room C-118, Medical 
College Building. 

Student Health Services 

The Student Health Plan of Cornell University 
Medical College provides hospitalization and 
major medical insurance for all graduate stu- 
dents. In addition, the Plan provides for ambula- 
tory care at the Personnel Health Service of 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. 
Physicians at the Health Service will refer stu- 
dents who require specialized care to clinics of 
the Hospital and to attending physicians of the 
staff. 

The cost of medical services provided by Ihe 
Plan are included in the tuition and fee structure 
announced by the College each academic year. 
Students will be issued Plan membership cards 
and will receive courtesy privileges at The New 
York Hospital Pharmacy. 

Entering students are requested to have a phys- 
ical examination, chest X-ray and laboratory 
tests performed by their personal physicians 
prior to matriculation. The hours of the Per- 
sonnel Health Service and a complete statement 
of Plan benefits will be provided to each 
graduate student. 

The College recommends that students pur- 
chase insurance coverage for eligible depend- 
ents who do not have other insurance available 
to them. Insured dependents are not eligible 
for care at the Personnel Health Service but they 
will be referred to appropriate members of the 
Hospital staff for medical treatment. 

A student on leave for study in absentia may 
continue hospitalization insurance by payment 
of the annual fees directly to the Student Ac- 
counting Office, Room C-015, Medical College 
Building. 



12 Residence Halls 



A student on a leave of absence for reasons 
other than study in absentia is not eligible to 
receive student health benefits. 



Residence Halls 

F. W. Olin Hall, a student residence, is at 445 
East Sixty-ninth Street directly across from the 
Medical College entrance on York Avenue. Olin 
Hall contains a gymnasium, snack bar, lounge 
and 174 residence rooms. Each residence room 
is furnished as a single bedroom-study, but 
since two rooms share a connecting bath, they 
may be used as a suite for two students. The 
rooms are completely furnished. The student 
housing fee is $1 ,380 for the 10-month academic 
year, $1 ,656 for the calendar year, or for shorter 
periods $138 per month. 



Livingston Farrand Apartments, also located on 
East Sixty-ninth Street just beyond Olin Hall, 
have furnished apartments of 1 1 /2, 2, 3, and 4 
rooms. Cooking facilities are provided in these 
apartments and housing fees in these buildings 
range from $169 to $330 per month. Apartments 
in these facilities are available to married stu- 
dents and upperclasspersons. 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, an apartment resi- 
dence, is located at 420 East Seventieth Street. 
This building contains studio, one-bedroom, and 
two-bedroom apartments. Apartments are fully 
furnished and housing fees range from $310 to 
$520 per month including utilities. Single, first- 
year students cannot be accommodated in this 
building. 

The fees listed above may be changed at any 
time without previous notice. 



Cornell University 



Fields of Instruction 



Instruction at the 
Medical College Division 

Biochemistry 

Faculty 

J. P. Blass, A. L. Boskey, E. Breslow, A. J. L. 
Cooper, J. Cornell, T. Duffy, G. F. Fairclough, 
J. D. Gass, H. Gilder, J. Goldstein, O. W. Griffith, 
R. H. Hashemeyer, B. Horecker, A. Meister, 
A. Novogrodsky, A. S. Posner, S. G. Powers, 
J. R. Rachele, R. R. Riggio, A. L. Rubin, B. 
Saxena, E. T. Schubert, R. L. Softer, K. H. 
Stenzel, S. S. Tate, P. P. Trotta, D. Wellner, 
K. Woods 

Field Representative 

S. S. Tate, Department of Biochemistry, Room 
E-106, Medical College, (212) 472-6190 

Graduate instruction is offered leading to the 
Ph.D. or M.S. degrees. Within the framework of 
degree requirements and in consultation with 
the student, the course of study is planned to fit 
the needs of the individual. Although formal 
course work is required, emphasis is placed on 
research. Research opportunities exist in var- 
ious fields of biochemistry including enzymol- 
ogy, structure and function of proteins and 
nucleic acids, molecular biology, physical 
biochemistry, and the intermediary metabolism 
of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, 
and lipids. Entering graduate students usually 
work for short periods in several of the labora- 
tories of the faculty members of the field before 
beginning their thesis research. Students are 
encouraged to choose challenging and funda- 
mental research problems that are on the 
frontiers of biochemistry. 

The laboratories of the faculty members are 
equipped with virtually all of the instruments 
and facilities required for modern biochemical 
research; thus, graduate students are instructed 
in such methodology as chromatography, coun- 
tercurrent distribution, radioactive and stable 
isotope techniques, spectrophotometry, electro- 
phoresis, and analytical ultracentrifugation. 

Students who undertake graduate study in bio- 
chemistry must have a sufficiently comprehen- 
sive background in chemistry to pursue the 



proposed course of study and must present 
evidence of knowledge of biology, general ex- 
perimental physics, and mathematics (including 
differential and integral calculus). Students may 
remedy deficiencies in these areas during the 
first year of graduate study. The Graduate 
Record Examinations (the Aptitude Test and the 
Advanced Test in chemistry) are ordinarily 
required. 

The language requirement for the Ph.D. and the 
M.S. degrees is proficiency in one modern for- 
eign language acceptable to the student's 
Special Committee. Proficiency in a computer 
programming language, as demonstrated by 
executing a meaningful program, may substitute 
for proficiency in a foreign language. 

Students are encouraged to complete applica- 
tions for fall admission before the preceding 
February 1 . 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

J. P. Blass: genetic and metabolic aspects of 
neurochemistry 

A. L. Boskey: mechanisms of biological calcifi- 
cations; role of phospholipids and proteogly- 
cans in bone and tooth formation; structural 
studies of hard tissue by X-ray crystallography 
and electron microscopy 

E. M. G. Breslow: structure-function relation- 
ships in the interactions between posterior 
pituitary proteins and hormones; protein- 
protein and metal ion-protein interactions 

A. J. L. Cooper: ammonia, amino acid and a- 
keto acid metabolism in the brain; use of ,3 N 
isotopic tracers in brain metabolic studies 

J. S. Cornell: biochemistry of reproduction; pro- 
tein chemistry of the placenta; endocrine 
influences in gestational diabetes and toxemia 
of pregnancy; anterior pituitary hormones 

T. E. Duffy: neurochemistry; carbohydrate and 
energy metabolism in altered functional states 
of brain; ammonia detoxifiication and hepatic 
coma; biochemistry of developing brain 

G. F. Faircloughxlinical biochemistry; pul- 
monary surfactant biosynthesis; lipoprotein 
structure and function 

J. D. Gass: mechanism of enzyme action; ap- 
plication of computers to biological problems 

H. Gilder: pulmonary lamellar bodies and sur- 
factant, lung lipid synthesis, evaluation of 
surfactant in etiology of oxygen toxicity, 



14 Instruction — Medical College Division 



metabolic response to surgery, experimental 
shock 

J. Goldstein: structure-function of red cell sur- 
face antigens; cell surface and differentiation; 
protein synthesis 

O. W. Griffith: design and synthesis of enzyme 
specific substrates and inhibitors; in vivo 
manipulation of metabolic pathways; enzyme 
mechanisms; sulfur amino acid metabolism 

R. H. Haschemeyer: structure of fibrinogen; 
subunit interactions in proteins; electron 
microscopy of macromolecules; lipoprotein 
and membrane structure; computer simulation 
and numerical analysis 

B. L. Horecker: intermediary metabolism; struc- 
ture-function relationships in biomolecules 

A. Meister: enzymology; amino acid metabolism 
and its relationships to human disease 

A. Novogrodsky: lymphocyte activation and cell- 
cell interactions; cellular and transplantation 
immunology 

A. S. Posner: crystal chemistry; ultrastructural 
biochemistry; atomic structure of bone; hard- 
tissue chemistry 

S. G. Powers: regulation of enzyme activity; 
protein-protein interactions; mechanism of 
enzyme action 

R. R. Riggio: transplantation: biochemistry of 
immunologic phenomena associated with 
humoral sensitization of transplantation 
antigens; and allograft tolerance 

A. L. Rubin: transplantation; antoimmune dis- 
ease, cellular biochemistry 

B. Saxena: chemistry, measurement, and 
mechanism of action of pituitary protein 
hormones; structure-function and hormone- 
receptor interaction of gonadotropins 

E. T. Schubert: enzyme studies of the developing 
kidney, clinical biochemistry 

R. L. Softer: angiotensin-converting enzyme; 
amino-acyl-tRNA-protein transferases; 
studies of membrane-bound enzymes 

K. H. Stenzel: cell proliferation and differentia- 
tion 

S. S. Tate: amino acid and peptide transport; 
plasma membrane enzymes; metabolism and 
physiology of hypothalamic releasing 
hormones 

P. P. Trotta; molecular basis of the immuno- 
deficiency diseases; biochemistry of colon 
cancer; structure-function relations in 
adenosine deaminase 

D. Wellner: mechanisms of enzyme action; 
enzyme kinetics; protein structure 

K. R. Woods: physical-chemical understanding 
of human blood fractions; blood coagulation, 
structure of antibodies; interferon synthesis 
and structure 



Courses 

1. Biochemistry Offered jointly by the faculties 
of the Medical College and Sloan-Kettering 



Divisions. Details are given on p. 35 under 
Interdivisional Courses. 

2. Introduction to Research Experimental 
biochemistry dealing with the isolation, syn- 
thesis, and analysis of substances of biochem- 
ical importance (enzymes, coenzymes, various 
metabolites, and intermediates), and study of 
their properties by various chemical and phys- 
ical techniques. The student obtains this varied 
research experience by spending approximately 
two months in the laboratory of each of four 
faculty members of his or her choice. For incom- 
ing graduate students majoring in biochemistry. 
The staff. 

3. Selected Topics in Biochemistry Advanced 
study in selected topics is offered in areas such 
as (1) nucleic acids and protein synthesis; (2) 
intermediary metabolism; (3) kinetics and en- 
zyme mechanism; (4) protein chemistry; (5) 
structure of membranes and the biochemistry of 
transport; and (6) hormones. Generally, one or 
two of these courses is offered yearly in the third 
trimester. The staff. 

4. Advanced Biochemistry Offered jointly by 
the faculties of the Medical College and Sloan- 
Kettering Divisions. Details are given on p. 35 
under Interdivisional Courses. 

5. Physical Methods Offered jointly by the 
faculties of the Medical College and Sloan- 
Kettering Divisions. Details are given on p. 35 
under Interdivisional Courses. 

Biological Structure and Cell Biology 

Faculty 

R. Bachvarova, C. G. Becker, J. M. Bedford, 

D. Bennett, D. C. Brooks, G. Dooher, F. G. Girgis, 
J. Goldstein. R. L. Greif, B. B. Kaplan, C. R. 
Minick, R. Nachman, T. C. Rodman, B. Saxena, 

E. T. Schubert, J. L. Sirlin, G. W. Siskind, 

D. Soifer, M. Spiegelman, D. H. Sussdorf, R. C. 
Swan, S. S. Wachtel, J. M. S. Winterkorn 

Field Representative 

J. L. Sirlin, Department of Anatomy, Room A-229, 
Medical College, (212) 472-6418 

Graduate study in the Field of Biological Struc- 
ture and Cell Biology leads to a Ph.D. degree 
and emphasizes the basic relationships between 
structure and function of biological systems at 
all levels of organization. Thus the field is funda- 
mentally concerned with the nature, develop- 
ment, and functional modulation of biological 
systems, as well as significance of configuration, 
pattern, and other spatial relations in biological 
systems. The scope of interest extends from the 
molecular level to that of the whole organism 



Instruction — Medical College Division 15 



and embraces normal as well as pathological 
structure. 

Opportunities for research training include the 
investigation of cellular fine structure using such 
techniques as light and electron microscopy, 
isolation and analysis of cellular subtractions by 
differential ultracentrifugation, cytochemistry, 
molecular biochemistry, and enzymology. 

For graduate study in the field, adequate under- 
graduate preparation in biology, chemistry (in- 
cluding organic chemistry), physics, and 
mathematics is recommended. Requirements for 
admission are flexible in proportion to the prom- 
ise and accomplishments of the applicant. 
Applicants are requested to present the results 
of the Graduate Record Examinations. 

Requirements for minor sponsorship in the field 
will be arranged with individual students, but 
research experience in the minor sponsor's 
laboratory is strongly encouraged. 

In addition to the courses listed below, ap- 
propriate courses for graduate students in the 
field are Biochemistry, Physiology, and those 
courses given by the Field of Neurobiology and 
Behavior. 

A reading knowledge of a foreign language is 
desirable. 

The field requires a qualifying examination at 
the end of the first year of residence. At the 
discretion of the examining committee, the ex- 
amination may be written, or oral, or both. The 
Admission to Candidacy Examination required 
by the Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
must be taken before six units of residence 
credit have been accumulated and before sub- 
stantial progress has been made in the candi- 
date's thesis research. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

R. Bachvarova: molecular developmental biol- 
ogy 

C. G. Becker: cardiovascular and renal disease; 
immunopathology 

J. M. Bedford: physiology of mammalian 
gametes and reproductive tract 

D. Bennett: mammalian genetics, with special 
reference to genetic regulation during early 
embryonic development 

D. C. Brooks: spontaneous electrical activity of 
the central nervous system; brain stem in- 
fluences upon the visual system during sleep 
and wakefulness in the cat 

G. Dooher: genetics and fine structure of male 
reproduction 

F. G. Girgis: the cranial and facial sutures, their 
development, structure, and the analysis of 
sutural position; of particular interest are 
factors inducing chondrogenesis in the cra- 
nial vault 



J. Goldstein: role of RNA in protein synthesis, 
fractionation of nucleic acids; role of macro- 
molecules and protein synthesis in the 
maturation of red blood cells 

R. L. Greif: physiology of the thyroid gland and 
its secretion 

B. B. Kaplan: gene activity and its regulation in 
brain 

C. R. Minick: pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis 
and hypertension; immunopathology; electron 
microscopy 

R. L. Nachman: biology of platelets 

T. C. Rodman: analytical cytology of cell nuclei; 
cytogenetics 

B. Saxena: chemistry, measurement, and mech- 
anism of action of pituitary protein hormones 

E. T. Schubert: enzyme studies of the developing 
kidney; investigation of renal dysfunction at 
enzyme level 

J. L. Sirlin: reproductive biology 

G. W. Siskind: immunology; ontogeny of immune 
response; antibody heterogeneity 

D. Soifer: structure and function of microtubules 
M. Spiegelman: early embryonic development, 

particularly with respect to cell movement and 

cellular interactions 
D. H. Sussdorf: cellular interactions during the 

immune response; function of the thymus and 

related lymphoid tissues in development of 

immunocompetence 
R. C. Swan: fine structure of excitable cells 
S. S. Wachtel: immunogenetics 
J. M. S. Winterkorn: visual behavior and learning 

after brain lesions 

Courses 

1. Cell Biology and Microscopic Anatomy 

Offered by the Staff of the Field of Biological 
Structure and Cell Biology, Medical College 
Division, in conjunction with the Department of 
Anatomy, Medical College. This course follows 
a cellular and differentiative approach aimed at 
understanding the structure-function correlates 
that characterize the different tissues and or- 
gans. Selected topics are presented in the lec- 
tures and laboratory exercises to indicate a 
pattern of study and depth of analysis that the 
student can be expected to apply to the study of 
cells and tissues. A microscope slide collection, 
presenting tissues and organs in a variety of 
physiological and developmental states, as well 
as correlative electron micrographs are provided 
for individual study in the laboratory. Students 
must provide their own compound microscopes 
through their departments or sponsors. First 
and second trimesters. Lectures: T Th 10-11, 
F 9-10. Laboratory: T Th 3-5, R. F. Bachvarova. 
J. J. Rasweiler. 

2. Gross Anatomy Regional anatomy is studied 
principally through dissection of the human 
body. Supplementing this technique are prosec- 
tions by instructors, tutorial group discussions, 
and radiographic and endoscopic demonstra- 



16 Instruction — Medical College Division 



tions. Enrollment is limited and students should 
consult the staff early in order to determine the 
availability of places. First and second trimes- 
ters. The staff. 

Genetics 

Faculty 

F. H. Allen, V. G. Allfrey, K. Artzt(SKD'), R. 
Bachvarova, D. Bennett(SKD), J. L Biedler(SKD), 
E. A. Boyse(SKD), W. T. Brown, R. S. K. Chaganti 
(SKD), B. S. Danes, G. Darlington, G. A. Dooher 
(SKD), B. Dupont(SKD), J. L. German, III. L. H. 
Graf, Jr., M. Hoffmann(SKD), E. Johnson, R. M. 
Krug(SKD), R. Kucherlapati(Visiting), G. Litman 
(SKD), S. D. Litwin, P. W. Melera(SKD), L. J. Old 
(SKD), J. K. Rankin(SKD), T. C. Rodman, P. 
Rubenstein, N. Sarkar(SKD), F. W. Shen(SKD), S. 
Silagi, M. Siniscalco(SKD), J. L. Sirlin, M. 
Spiegelman(SKD), J. Stavnezer(SKD) 

* Sloan-Kettering Division. 
Field Representative 

G. Darlington, Department of Medicine, Room 
F-208, Medical College, (212) 472-8278 

Academic and research training is available 
chiefly in the following areas: cytogenetics, de- 
velopmental genetics, genetics and cell differen- 
tiation, human biochemical genetics, human 
somatic cell genetics, immunogenetics, micro- 
bial genetics, and nucleic acid biochemistry. 
The faculty includes members of the preclinical 
and clinical departments of the Medical College 
and faculty members of the Sloan-Kettering 
Division. A unique opportunity for integrating 
the study of genetics with other biological and 
medical interests is thus provided. Within broad 
limits, students pursue their own programs ac- 
cording to particular interests. 

The usual prerequisites for admission to gradu- 
ate study for an advanced degree in genetics 
are undergraduate work in chemistry or biology, 
and courses in general genetics, general chem- 
istry, organic chemistry, general biology, general 
physics, and mathematics through calculus. 
Applicants are required to present Graduate 
Record Examinations scores in the Aptitude 
Tests and in the Advanced Test in chemistry or 
biology. 

Courses generally required of genetics majors 
are those numbered 1 through 3 below, and 
Graduate Biochemistry Microscopic Anatomy, 
given by the Field of Biochemistry and by the 
Field of Biological Structure, respectively. Other 
courses for students in genetics include those 
numbered 4 and 5 and Advanced Virology of- 
fered by the Field of Microbiology. 

Students minoring in genetics may be required 
to take two semesters of the Genetics Seminar 
and Advanced Genetics. A limited period of 
work in the laboratory of the minor sponsor is 
recommended. 



Requirements for foreign language are at the 
discretion of the student's Special Committee. 

An oral qualifying examination is required at 
the end of the first year of residence and the 
Admission to Candidacy Examination must be 
taken at the end of the second year of graduate 
work. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

F. H. Allen: immunogenetics of blood groups 
V. G. Allfrey: cell nucleus chemistry, chromo- 
somal proteins; genetic control 

K. Artzt: genetics of embryonal tumors 

R. Bachvarova: developmental molecular biology 

D. Bennett: mammalian developmental genetics; 
immunogenetics 

J. L. Biedler: cytogenetics 

E. A. Boyse: mammalian immunogenetics 
W. T. Brown: human genetics 

R. Chaganti: human genetics; cell genetics 
B. S. Danes: somatic cell genetics (with particu- 
lar emphasis on human genetic metabolic 
errors) 

G. Darlington: human genetics; cell genetics 
G. Dooher: genetics and fine structure of male 

reproduction 
B. Dupont: human immunogenetics 
J. L. German: mammalian cell genetic? and 

cytogenetics 
L. H. Graf, Jr.: molecular genetics 
M. Hoffmann: H-2 immunogenetics 

E. Johnson: eukaryotic gene expression and 
packaging 

R. M. Krug: viral and molecular genetics 

R. Kucherlapati: gene transfer 

G. Litman: immunogenetics 

S. D. Litwin: genetics of immunoglobulins and 
serum proteins 

P. W. Melera: molecular eukaryotic genetics 

L. J. Old: tumor immunovirology 

J. K. Rankin: neuro-oncology 

T. C. Rodman: cytogenetics with emphasis on 
mechanisms of genetic control 

P. Rubenstein: immunogenetics; histocom- 
patibility; genetics; immunology; immuno- 
hematology 

N. Sarkar: viral genetics 

F. W. Shen: immunogenetics 

S. Silagi: gene action and cellular differentiation 

in culture 
M. Siniscalco: somatic cell genetics 
J .Sirlin: molecular biology of brain function 
M. Spiegelman: early embryonic development 
J. Stavnezer: isolation and differentiation of 

immunoglobulin genes 



Courses 

1. Genetics Seminar The topics and sponsors 
for the Genetics Seminar will be announced at 
a later time. The seminar is normally scheduled 
to be given on Mondays from 3-5 p.m. during 
the first, second and third trimesters. 



Instruction — Medical College Division 17 



2. Genetics Journal Club An informal meeting 
of students and staff at which current literature 
or research is discussed. Held every two weeks 
throughout the year. F 12. R. Bachvarova. 

3. Advanced Genetics Designed to give the 
student a sound background in genetic theory; 
an in-depth consideration of the gene as a unit 
of heredity. First semester: three hours each 
week to be arranged. Alternate years. Offered 
1981-82. D. Bennett. 

4. Introduction to Research in Genetics Stu- 
dents are expected during their first year to 
spend time and perform experiments in the 
laboratories of three faculty members of the 
Field of Genetics. 

5. Medical Genetics Rounds Students partic- 
ipate in the activities of the Medical Genetics 
Clinic by assisting in the taking of family his- 
tories, construction of pedigrees, and in genetic 
counseling. Ward rounds are carried out weekly. 
The staff of the Division of Human Genetics. 

6. Karyotyping Practical experience in chro- 
mosome analysis in the laboratory. Introduction 
to tissue culture techniques. Limited to two stu- 
dents. Third trimester: one day a week for seven 
weeks; hours to be arranged. J. L. German. 

Microbiology 

Faculty 

R. W. Dickerman, E. A. Goidl, T. C. Jones, S. R. 
Meshnick, W. M. O'Leary, R. B. Roberts, C. A. 
Santos-Buch, W. F. Scherer, L. B. Senterfit, G. 
W. Siskind, D. H. Sussdorf, M. E. Weksler, M. 
E. Wiebe 

Field Representative 

R. W. Dickerman, Department of Microbiology, 
Room B-414, Medical College, (212) 472-6550 

The Field of Microbiology offers graduate train- 
ing leading to the Ph.D. degree. Under special 
circumstances, candidacy towards the M.S. 
degree will be considered. Candidates may 
select an area of research from such microbio- 
logical topics as general and medical bacteriol- 
ogy, microbial chemistry and physiology, im- 
munology, and virology, and parasitology. 

Prospective students should complete at the 
undergraduate level a minimum of one year (or 
its equivalent) in general chemistry, organic 
chemistry, general physics, mathematics (includ- 
ing college algebra), botany or zoology (prefer- 
ably both), and one semester or its equivalent 
of analytical or quantitative chemistry. General 
microbiology or bacteriology and calculus are 
strongly recommended. Students who have not 
completed the above requirements may be ad- 
mitted to graduate study on the condition that 



deficiencies be corrected soon after admission. 
Applicants are ordinarily required to present 
Graduate Record Examinations scores for the 
Aptitude Tests and for the Advanced Test in 
chemistry or biology. 

Individual programs are determined by the stu- 
dent's Special Committee, composed of faculty 
members representing the major and minor 
fields. Students majoring in microbiology select 
their primary courses from those listed below. 
The nature and number of other courses that 
may be taken at this institution or at nearby 
universities will depend on the students' minor 
fields, their research activities, their individual 
interests, and the advice of the Special Com- 
mittees. All students majoring in microbiology 
are required to assist in the teaching of courses 
offered by the field. 

Students majoring in other fields who elect to 
minor in microbiology are ordinarily required to 
take the course Microbiology and an Introduc- 
tion to Infectious Disease. In addition, students 
are required to enroll in an advanced course in 
microbiology or participate in a research project 
in the laboratory of their minor sponsors. In 
general this research is expected to take one 
to three months to complete, depending upon 
whether the project is pursued on a full-time or 
part-time basis. 

Ph.D. candidates are required to be proficient 
in one modern foreign language acceptable to 
their Special Committees. 

Although a qualifying examination is not ordi-, 
narily given, a student's Special Committee has 
the prerogative of requiring it. The Admission 
to Candidacy Examination is administered by a 
committee consisting of a chairperson appointed 
by the dean, the student's Special Committee, 
and three additional faculty members in the 
Field of Microbiology. The written portion of this 
examination tests for basic facts and concepts 
in the candidate's area of study and for the can- 
didate's problem-solving ability within and across 
disciplinary boundaries. The oral examination 
provides an opportunity for the student to cor- 
rect deficiencies in the written examination, to 
be examined further on general knowledge, and 
to discuss and be questioned on his or her 
planned or current research. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

R. W. Dickerman: involvement of birds and mam- 
mals in the ecology of viruses pathogenic to 
man 

E. A. Goidl: regulation immune response, aging 
and autoimmunity, autoanti-idiotype anti- 
bodies, immunity and parasitic diseases 

T. C. Jones: intracellular parasitism; macro- 
phage function; immune responses to 
protozoa 

S. R. Meshnick: adaption of infectious protozoa 
to intracellular survival; design of antiproto- 
zoal agents 



18 Instruction — Medical College Division 



W. M. O'Leary: microbial composition; mecha- 
nisms of pathogenesis; antibiotic function; 
instrumental characterization of bacteria; in- 
fectious infertility 

R. B. Roberts: interactions between microorgan- 
isms and phagocytic cells 

C. A. Santos-Buch: parasitic diseases; immuno- 
pathology; cardiovascular disease 

W. F. Scherer: cell-virus relationships; virus 
virulence; host defense mechanisms; ecology 
and epidemiology of arbo viruses, especially 
mosquito-borne encephalitis viruses of 
tropical North and South America 

L. B. Senterfit: antigenic structure of myco- 
plasma; pathogenesis of respiratory viral and 
mycoplasmic disease; vaccine development; 
clinical microbiology 

G. W. Siskind: regulation immune response, 
especially anti-idiotype antibody; control of 
antibody affinity and heterogeneity; ontology 
of heterogeneity of antibody affinity; effect of 
aging on the immune response 

D. H. Sussdorf: immunological factors in car- 
cinogenesis; immunocompetence of the 
athymic ('nude') mouse; macrophage function 

M. E. Weksler: lymphocyte interactions with 
autologous cells in autoimmune and neo- 
plastic diseases; immunobiology of aging 

M. E. Wiebe: human interferon induction, syn- 
thesis and regulation; molecular virology 



Courses 

Students who want to attend any of the following 
courses either for credit or as auditors should 
contact the field representative or the faculty 
member responsible for each course well in ad- 
vance of the beginning of each course. In 
general, as many students as possible are ac- 
commodated in lectures; however, participation 
in laboratory sections is restricted. 

1. Microbiology for Graduate Students (Inter- 
divisional.) Not offered 1981-1982. 

2. Microbiology and an Introduction to Infec- 
tious Disease Presented in the first and second 
trimesters. Consists of laboratory experiments, 
lectures, and group discussions. The laboratory 
work includes an introduction to the procedures 
used in studying microorganisms, experiments 
on various physical and biological manifesta- 
tions of antigen-antibody reactions, the actions 
of chemotherapeutic agents, a survey of the 
microbial flora of the upper respiratory and 
lower intestinal tracts of healthy humans, and an 
intensive study of the causal agents of specific 
infections, including fungi, spirochetes, rick- 
ettsiae, and viruses, as well as bacteria. The 
lectures are directed toward the development of 
basic concepts, particularly the principles in- 
volved in microbial growth, the principles 
underlying active immunization, and the factors 
that enter into host-parasite relationships. Em- 



phasis is placed on aspects related to the 
etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, and pre- 
vention of infectious disease. Special attention 
is also given to the immunological principles 
underlying such noninfectious conditions as 
hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, and graft rejec- 
tion. Offered every year. Microbiology staff and 
invited lecturers. 

3. Advanced Diagnostic Microbiology The lec- 
ture and laboratory sessions acquaint the 
student with the procedures used in and tech- 
niques of management of a clinical microbiology 
laboratory. Emphasis is upon developing the 
student's capability in the isolation and rapid 
identification of organisms from various types of 
clinical specimens. Liberal use is made of clin- 
ical materials available through the diagnostic 
laboratories of the New York Hospital. Offered 
every year in the third trimester. Hours by 
arrangement. L. B. Senterfit. 

4. Microbial Chemistry and Physiology Lec- 
tures cover literature and methodology pertinent 
to physicochemical properties of microorgan- 
isms and their environments, the growth and 
death of microorganisms, chemical composition 
of cells and subcellular structures, nutritional 
requirements, microbiological assay and auxo- 
trophic mutants, energy metabolism, degrada- 
tions and biosyntheses, the physiology of 
pathogenesis, and important microbial products. 
Laboratory sessions provide experience with 
large-scale culture and recovery of cells, syn- 
thetic media, microbiological assay, extraction 
of cellular constituents, respirometry, and 
studies of substrate utilization employing radio- 
active metabolites. Minimal prerequisites: 
general microbiology, qualitative and quantita- 
tive analysis, organic chemistry, and at least one 
semester (or its equivalent) of biochemistry. 
Offered every other year in the third trimester. 
Offered 1981-1982. W. M. O'Leary. 

5. Advanced Microbial Genetics Selected 
concepts of molecular genetics are examined 
using both prokaryotic and eukaryotic micro- 
organisms as models. Topics include intra- and 
intercistronic complementation, mitotic and 
meiotic recombination, genetic control mech- 
anisms, gene conversion, polyploidy and 
aneuploidy, genetic interference, mechanisms of 
suppression, and polarity. The course is de- 
signed to elucidate the genetic methods 
available for studying hereditary material. Of- 
fered every second year in the third trimester, 
one lecture weekly. Not offered 1981-1982. 

6. Advanced Immunology. Offered jointly by 
the faculties of the Medical College and Sloan- 
Kettering Divisions. Details are given on p. 35 
under Interdivisional Courses. 



Instruction — Medical College Division 19 



7. Advanced Virology. Presents, in lectures 
and laboratory sessions, modern concepts and 
techniques of virology. Minimal prerequisites 
for credit are general microbiology and at least 
one semester (or its equivalent) of biochemistry. 
W. F. Scherer and R. W. Dickerman. Not offered 
in 1981-1982. 

8. Research on Special Problems For students 
who want significant experience in specialized 
procedures, which they could not obtain other- 
wise, the field offers individualized research on 
special problems. The nature, complexity, and 
time required for such research vary according 
to the needs and desires of each student. Such 
experience is available in each specialty cov- 
ered by the factulty of the field and can be 
arranged by consultation of the student with the 
appropriate faculty member. Available each year 
and throughout the year. The staff. 

9. Thesis Research in Microbiology Required 
of all students taking a major in microbiology. 
Offered yearly and throughout the year. The 
staff. 

10. Microbiology Seminar Reports on surveys 
of the literature in the field and on current re- 
search. Presented by graduate students, faculty, 
and visiting scientists. Attendance is required of 
all students majoring or minoring in micro- 
biology throughout their programs of study. 
Offered yearly and throughout the year. One- 
hour sessions alternate weeks, hours to be 
arranged. R. W. Dickerman. 

11. Clinical Microbiology Program — Ithaca and 
New York Campuses During the senior year of 
a special undergraduate study program at Ithaca 
or during the year after receiving a bachelor's 
degree, the student may concentrate on devel- 
oping skills in clinical microbiology at the 
Cornell Medical School-New York Hospital in 
New York City. Students participate in courses 
concerned with microbiology, an introduction to 
infectious diseases, diagnostic microbiology, 
parasitology, immunology, and virology, in addi- 
tion to working in the hospital diagnostic 
laboratory. This clinical microbiology specializa- 
tion is designed to prepare students for employ- 
ment in clinical microbiology laboratories. 
However, it could also be selected by students 
interested in further education or other careers. 

Neurobiology and Behavior 

Faculty 

I. B. Black, D. C. Brooks, A. J. L. Cooper, T. 
Duffy, D. Gardner, M. S. Gazzaniga, J. G. Gibbs, 
Jr., G. E. Gibson, B. Grafstein, W. D. Hagamen, 
M. Hamburg, K. A. Halmi, T. H. Joh, B. B. Kaplan. 
J. A. Kessler, D. Levy, K. W. Lieberman, T. H. 
Meikle, Jr., M. Okamoto, V. M. Pickel, F. Plum. 



D. J. Reis, W. F. Riker, Jr., J A. Sechzer, C. P. 
Smith, P. E. Stokes, J. M. S. Winterkorn 

Field Representative 

B B. Kaplan, Department of Anatomy, Room 
A-016. Medical College, (212) 472-6412 

The Field of Neurobiology and Behavior pro- 
vides training in the study of the nervous system. 
It includes the disciplines of neuroanatomy, 
neuroembryology, neurophysiology, neurophar- 
macology, neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, 
and neuropsychology and perception. The pro- 
gram of the field emphasizes a multi-disciplinary 
approach to the study of the nervous system, 
based on the belief that future advances in our 
understanding of the nervous system will be 
derived from knowledge of the thinking and 
research techniques employed by more than one 
discipline. Toward this end, the program of the 
students entering the field is planned in consul- 
tation with several staff members, and the 
students are expected to spend some period of 
time working closely with members of the 
faculty whose interests are related to theirs. In 
addition, there are regularly scheduled seminars 
in the field during which various aspects of work 
in progress are presented and discussed. By 
these means, the students are afforded the 
broadest possible view of the field during their 
total training experience. 

The student who chooses Neurobiology and 
Behavior as a major field will be required to 
satisfy the requirements of the courses in neuro- 
science, statistics, and biomathematics, and two 
of the following: microscopic anatomy, physiol- 
ogy, biochemistry, or pharmacology. The 
student whose major field is Neurobiology and 
Behavior must have two minors, at least one of 
which is outside the field. In addition, participa- 
tion in the seminar program and advanced 
course offerings is expected. While there are no 
language requirements, it is suggested that the 
student achieve mastery of a modern foreign 
language or a computer programming language. 
When neurobiology is chosen as a minor field 
of study, the student is required to participate in 
the neuroscience course and the seminar pro- 
gram as well as obtain any additional experi- 
ence that the minor sponsor may suggest. 

Applicants to the Field of Neurobiology and 
Behavior are expected to have had adequate 
undergraduate training in biology, organic 
chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Graduate 
Record Examination scores are to be submitted 
with the application. An interview with the ap- 
plicant is considered highly desirable. 

Courses 

1. Neuroscience This is the basic undergrad- 
uate medical course and is required of all major 



20 Instruction — Medical College Division 



and minor candidates in the field. It is a broadly 
based course taught by members of the field and 
introduces the student to neuroanatomy, neuro- 
physiology, and pertinent neurology. Third 
trimester. D. Brooks and B. Grafstein. 

2. Advanced Neuroscience A course designed 
to elaborate upon material presented in the 
basic medical course. The goal is to provide 
the student with sufficient expertise to critically 
evaluate original research contributions in a 
wide variety of sub-fields in the neurosciences. 
Required course for all major and minor candi- 
dates in the field. Two one-hour lectures each 
week. Schedule to be arranged. 

3. Neurobiology Elective Each year the field 
offers an elective course that considers various 
special aspects of neurobiology and behavior. 
In the past, the courses have examined in depth 
the synapse, developmental neurobiology, and 
the impact of the environment on the nervous 
system. Offered in the third trimester, two hours 
each week; hours to be arranged, four to twenty 
students. B. Grafstein and staff. 

4. Advanced Neurobiology Seminar An elec- 
tive seminar series covering selected topics in 
neuropharmacology, neurochemistry and neuro- 
physiology. Offered in the first and second tri- 
mesters, one hour each week. F. Plum and staff. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

I. Black: development neurobiology in periphery 
and brain, including enzyme regulation, trans- 
synaptic controls; genetic influences 

D. Brooks: brain stem influence on the electrical 
activity of the visual system during sleep and 
wakefulness 

A. J. L. Cooper: ammonia, amino acid and 
a-keto acid metabolism in the brain; use of 
! "N isotopic tracers in brain metabolic studies 

T. Duffy: carbohydrate and energy metabolism 
in altered functional states of the brain; am- 
monia detoxification and hepatic coma; effect 
of anoxia on the developing brain 

D. Gardner: neurobiology and biophysics of 
invertebrate synaptic transmission 

M. S. Gazzaniga: neuropsychological approaches 
to behavior 

J. Gibbs: central and peripheral mechanisms of 
feeding behavior in animals and humans 

G. E. Gibson: relationship of carbohydrate 
metabolism to neurotransmitter synthesis 

K. A. Halmi: endocrine investigations; epide- 
miological-demographic treatment studies of 
eating disorders 

M. Hamburg: regulatory mechanisms for the 
biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotrans- 
mitters 

T. H. Joh: neurochemistry and regulatory 
mechanisms of the enzymes involved in 
monoamine biosynthesis 



B. B. Kaplan: gene activity and its regulation in 
brain and cultured cells of neuroectodermal 
origin 

J. A. Kessler: biochemistry of peptidergic 
neurons and physiology of nerve growth 
factors 

D. E. Levy: mechanisms of ischemic brain 
damage 

K. W. Lieberman: neurochemical aspects of 

mental illness and alcoholism 
T. Meikle: animal studies of neural mechanisms 

basic to learned behavior, particularly visual 

learning 

M. Okamoto: neuropharmacology; sedative- 
hypnotic drug dependence 

V. M. Pickel: immunocytochemistry of mono- 
amine synthesizing enzymes in development 
and regeneration 

F. Plum: cerebral metabolism in disease states; 
central regulation systems 

D. J. Reis: central neural regulation of cardio- 
vascular function; regeneration and degenera- 
tion in CNS; neurobiology of central mono- 
amine neurons 

W. F. Riker, Jr.: pharmacology and physiology of 
neuromuscular transmission 

J. Sechzer: visual learning and memory in adult 
and neonatal split-brain animals; learning and 
memory in split-brain animals 

G. Smith: feeding behavior, emotional behavior, 
and learning in rats and monkeys, utilizing 
concepts of neuroendocrinology 

P. Stokes: endocrinology and psychobiology 
J. M .S. Winterkorn: visual behavior and learning 
after brain lesions 

Pathology 

Faculty 

D. R. Alonso, C. G. Becker, P. G. Bullough, 
F. Daniels, Jr., J. W. Dougherty, J. T. Ellis, A. 
Kellner, R. C. Mellors, C. R. Minick, G. E. 
Murphy, C. K. Petito, A. M. Prince, C. A. Santos- 
Buch, L. B. Senterfit, M. Susin, M. E. Weksler 

Field Representative 

C. G. Becker, Department of Pathology, Room 
C-444. Medical College, (212) 472-5983 

Pathology is the study of the causes and mech- 
anisms of disease processes. The purpose of a 
graduate program in pathology is to provide 
individuals with a baccalaureate or medical de- 
gree with basic knowledge of disease processes 
through study of the disciplines of anatomic and 
clinical pathology and by learning modern tech- 
niques of biological investigation. It is hoped 
that a student completing this program will have 
both the information and technical skills to 
make significant inquiries into the nature of 
disease processes and to bridge the gap be- 
tween classical, descriptive pathology and such 
disciplines as biochemistry and molecular 
biology. 



Instruction — Medical College Division 21 



The graduate program in pathology includes the 
observation of diseases in their various forms at 
autopsy and in clinical laboratories and study 
and research in the areas of immunology and 
immunopathology, oncology, virology, cellular 
biology, and electron microscopy. It may also 
include study in advanced mathematics, physiol- 
ogy, biophysics, pharmacology, anatomy, cyto- 
chemistry and histochemistry, advanced 
biochemistry, genetics and microbiology. 

New students are expected to have completed 
mathematics through integral calculus, chem- 
istry through organic chemistry (although 
physical chemistry is recommended), basic 
physics and at least general biology. A reading 
knowledge of at least one foreign language is 
suggested but not required. For those students 
entering the program with baccalaureate de- 
grees only, the Graduate Record Examinations, 
including the Aptitude Tests and the Advanced 
Test in biology or chemistry, are required. 

Graduate students in pathology are required, as 
a beginning part of their program, to take the 
course in general and systemic pathology of- 
fered to second-year medical students. They 
must minor in at least one and not more than 
two other biomedical fields. Courses in bio- 
mathematics, biochemistry, genetics, and 
microbiology are also required. Additional 
courses not available at the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences can be taken at neighboring 
institutions with approval of the Field of Pathol- 
ogy and the candidate's Special Committee. 



L. B. Senterfit: antigenic structure of mycoplas- 
ma; pathogenesis of respiratory viral and 
mycoplasmic disease; vaccine development; 
clinical microbiology 

M. Susin: pathology of renal disease; electron 
microscopy 

M. E. Weksler: lymphocyte interactions with au- 
tologous cells in autoimmune and neoplastic 
diseases; immunology in aging 

Courses 

1. General and Systemic Pathology Lectures, 
practical classes, and seminars. First trimester: 
M W F 9-1 . Second trimester: M W 1 0-1 , Th 9-1 . 
The staff. 

2. Correlative Pathology Gross and micro- 
scopic material is correlated and related to the 
disease processes. The staff. 

3. Forensic Pathology Courses are offered by 
special arrangement with the chief medical 
examiner of New York City. 

4. Seminars in Pathology Discussions outlin- 
ing the scope of modern pathology are given 
weekly. These include reports on original re- 
search by members of the staff and by visiting 
lecturers. Hours to be arranged. The staff. 

5. Experimental Pathology Independent re- 
search projects in various areas of pathology 
are offered. The staff. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

D. R. Alonso: cardiovascular pathology 

C. G. Becker: cardiovascular and renal diseases; 

immunopathology; host-parasite relationships 
P. G. Bullough: diseases and metabolism of 

bone 

F. Daniels, Jr.: diseases of the skin 
J. W. Dougherty: diseases of the skin 

J. T. Ellis: electron microscopy; kidney disease; 
muscle diseases 

A. Kellner: immunohematology; lipid metab- 
olism; pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis 

R. C. Mellors: studies in immunopathology relat- 
ing to the role of viruses in autoimmune 
disease and leukemogenesis 

C. R. Minick: pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis 
and hypertension; lipid metabolism; immuno- 
pathology; electron microscopy 

G. E. Murphy: cardiovascular diseases; host- 
parasite relationships 

C. K. Petito: neuropathology; ultrastructure and 
histochemistry of diseases of central nervous 
system 

A. M. Prince: virology; pathogenesis of liver 
diseases 

C. A. Santos-Buch: cellular biology; immuno- 
pathology; cardiovascular disease; electron 
microscopy 



Related courses The following courses are 
offered by various members of the field in 
collaboration with faculty members of related 
fields. The terms and hours are by arrangement. 

Immunopathology 

Cardiovascular Pathology 

Autopsy Pathology 

Orthopedic Pathology 

Renal Pathology 

Gastrointestinal Pathology 

Neuropathology 

Surgical Pathology 

Cytopathology 

Tumor Pathology 

Clinical Biochemistry 

Hematology and Immunochematology 

Clinical Microbiology 



Pharmacology 

Faculty 

T. Baker, J. J. Burns, W. W. Y. Chan. D. E. 
Drayer, R. W. Houde, C. E. Inturrisi, B. Jones, R. 
F. Kaiko, H. Kutt, R. Levi, M. Okamoto, G. W. 
Pasternak, M. M. Reidenberg. A. Rifkind. W. F. 
Riker. Jr.. H. H. Szeto 



22 Instruction — Medical College Division 



Field Representative 

M. Okamoto, Department of Pharmacology, Room 
E-411, Medical College, (212) 472-5975 

The graduate program emphasizes sound basic 
training in general pharmacology. Then, by 
means of individual instruction, the candidate 
receives exposure to several specialized aspects 
of pharmacology. The latter part of the graduate 
curriculum is devoted to research in an area of 
the candidate's choice. 

An adequate preliminary training in organic 
chemistry, physical chemistry, biochemistry, and 
physiology is prerequisite to graduate work in 
pharmacology. Training in statistics is strongly 
recommended. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

T. Baker: neurotoxicology; neuromuscular 

transmission 
J. J. Burns: biochemical pharmacology; drug 

metabolism 

W. W. Y. Chan: renal pharmacology; endocrine 
pharmacology, polypeptide pharmacology 

D. E. Drayer: clinical pharmacology; drug 
metabolism 

R. W. Houde: clinical pharmacology of the anal- 
gesic drugs; development of methods of 
evaluating the effects of drugs on subjective 
response 

C .E. Inturrisi: biochemical pharmacology; 

metabolism of narcotic response 
B. Jones: clinical pharmacology, chemotherapy 

of neoplastic diseases 
R. F. Kaiko: clinical pharmacology of analgesic 

drugs 

H. Kutt: clinical pharmacology, neuropharmacol- 
ogy; drug metabolism 

R. Levi: cardiovascular pharmacology; immuno- 
pharmacology 

M. Okamoto: neuropharmacology; sedative- 
hypnotic drug dependence 

G. W. Pasternak: molecular pharmacology, 
narcotic drug receptors 

M. M. Reidenberg: clinical pharmacology; drug 
metabolism 

A. Rifkind: clinical pharmacology; endocrine 
pharmacology 

W. F. Riker, Jr.: general pharmacology; neuro- 
pharmacology; neuromuscular transmission 

H. H. Szeto: fetal pharmacology, drug 
metabolism 



Courses 

1. General Pharmacology The basic phar- 
macology course is offered to second-year 
medical students and to qualified graduate stu- 
dents. It consists of lectures, laboratory work, 
demonstrations, and seminars given during the 
first and second trimesters. The purpose of 
these exercises is to teach the principles of 



pharmacology. Detailed consideration is given 
to the parameters of drug action to provide the 
student with the fundamental concepts essential 
for the evaluation of any drug. Consequently, the 
scientific basis of pharmacology is emphasized. 
Prototype drugs, esentially considered sys- 
temically, serve to illustrate several mechanisms 
and parameters of drug action. Therapeutic 
applications are considered only insofar as they 
illustrate principles of pharmacology or drug 
hazards. Prerequisites: biochemistry and phys- 
iology. The staff. 



2. Advanced Courses in Pharmacology 

a. Molecular Pharmacology Fundamental prin- 
ciples governing the effects of chemicals on 
living systems are examined from the viewpoint 
of drug-receptor interactions. Several concepts 
are introduced including drug selectivity, spe- 
cificity dose-response, and receptor theory. 
Examples of receptor isolation and receptor- 
drug interactions are discussed in detail. Pre- 
requisites: an adequate background in biology, 
organic and physical chemistry, and biochem- 
istry is required. The staff and invited lecturers. 
Offered every other year. Offered 1981-1982, 
third trimester. 

b. Immunopharmacology The course focuses 
on the fundamentals of immunologic cell reac- 
tions and explores the mechanism of therapeutic 
immunologic regulation. Topics include: inflam- 
matory and allergic processes; mechanism of 
cell activation; mediated release and action; 
cyclicnycleotides and prostaglandins; lym- 
phokines, interferons and thymic hormones; 
immunotoxicology; immunologic assays and use 
of biologies and drugs for immunotherapy. A 
background in immunology would be helpful but 
not required. The course is offered by the joint 
efforts of the faculties of the Medical College 
and the Sloan-Kettering Divisions, and is offered 
every other year. Not offered 1981-1982. 

3. Research in Pharmacology Research op- 
portunities may be arranged throughout the 
year for graduate students who are not majoring 
in pharmacology but who want some inves- 
tigative experience in the discipline. Special 
opportunities are offered for work on the 
nervous and cardiovascular systems and in 
biochemical and clinical aspects of pharmacol- 
ogy. The staff. 

4. Seminars The Field of Pharmacology offers 
seminars in areas of interest to the faculty and 
graduate students of the field. Seminars in 
clinical pharmacology and teaching rounds are 
held regularly throughout the year. The content, 
format and schedule of these seminars are 
determined each year on the basis of the num- 
ber and the backgrounds of the interested 
students. The staff. 



Instruction — Medical College Division 23 



Physiology 

Faculty 

O. S. Andersen, W. A. Briscoe, W. W. Y. Chan, 
T. J. Colatsky, C. Fell, G. Frindt, D. Gardner, B. 
Grafstein, R. L. Greif, E. Heinz, N. B. Javitt, C. 
Lee, R. Levi, M. Lipkin, T. N. Maack, L. Palmer, 
T. G. Pickering, E. M. Rabellino, E. E. Windhager 

Field Representative 

T. M. Maack, Department of Physiology and Bio- 
physics, Room D-407, Medical College, (212) 
472-5281 

Opportunities are offered toward the Ph.D. 
degree in several areas of physiology and bio- 
physics. Ample space is available, and labora- 
tories are well-equipped to provide predoctoral 
training in a medical environment. Interested 
individuals are urged to contact the field repre- 
sentative before preparing a formal application. 
Letters of inquiry should include a discussion of 
educational background and indicate possible 
areas of emphasis in graduate study. There has 
been a tendency to encourage applications from 
individuals who have a probab'e interest in one 
or more of the areas of physiology represented 
within the field. 

Formal applications should include full college 
transcripts and at least two letters of recom- 
mendation. Graduate Record Examination scores 
are mandatory, since performance in these ex- 
aminations is an important factor in the selection 
of applicants. Introductory courses in biology, 
inorganic and organic chemistry, physics, and 
mathematics through the level of differential 
and integral calculus are req jired. Additional 
course work in these disciplines at the under- 
graduate level is encouraged. Applicants with 
otherwise exemplary records who lack certain 
course requirements will be considered for ac- 
ceptance provided that they remedy their defi- 
ciencies while in training. 

The course of study emphasizes the importance 
of teaching and research in the preparation and 
development of individuals for careers in physi- 
ology. This goal is achieved by a combination of 
didactic courses, seminars, and closely super- 
vised research leading toward the preparation 
of a satisfactory thesis. 

A special program of study will be developed for 
each student in consultation with his or her 
Special Committee. In addition to the general 
requirements set by the Graduate School for all 
fields, all candidates for the doctoral degree in 
physiology will be expected to meet the follow- 
ing specific requirements: 

1. Evidence of a satisfactory background in 
neurosciences. Ordinarily, the course in neuro- 
science described under the Field of Neurobiol- 
ogy and Behavior, or an equivalent course, will 
be taken concurrently with the course in physiol- 
ogy and biophysics. 



2. Satisfactory completion of the course in 
physiology and biophysics, or an equivalent 
course. 

3. For majors and minors in the field, a minimum 
of two elective courses in the field ordinarily 
will be required, in addition to the course in 
physiology and biophysics. 

4. Proficiency in reading scientific literature in 
one modern foreign language. 

5. Satisfactory completion of an individualized 
laboratory experience in an area of research 
different from that chosen for the doctoral dis- 
sertation. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

O. S. Andersen: properties of cell membranes, 

artificial lipid membranes 
W. A. Briscoe: blood gas transfer in health and 

disease 

W. W. Y. Chan: pharmacology of neurohypo- 
physial hormones and related polypeptides 
T. J. Colatsky: cardiac electrophysiology 

C. Fell: cardiovascular function, particularly 
blood flow distribution, blood volume, and 
blood volume distribution 

G. Frindt: renal electrolyte metabolism; isolated 
perfused tubules 

D. Gardner: neurophysiology 

B. Grafstein: nerve regeneration and transport 
of materials in nerve axons 

R. L. Greif: physiology of the thyroid gland and 
its secretions 

E. Heinz: membrane transport; active transport 
N. B. Javitt: gastrointestinal and hepatic physiol- 
ogy and pathophysiology 

C. Lee: cardiac electrolyte physiology 

R. Levi: heart electrophysiology; heart hyper- 
sensitivity reactions; histamine in cardiac 
function 

M. Lipkin: proliferation and differentiation of 
normal and diseased gastrointestinal cells 

T. M. Maack: protein transport and metabolism 
by the kidney 

L. Palmer: Mechanisms of hormonal action in 
epithelia 

T. G. Pickering: cardiovascular physiology and 
pathophysiology 

E. M. Rabellino: expression of membrane re- 
ceptors and antigens in differentiating blood 
cells 

E. Windhager: renal electrolyte metabolism 
Courses 

Students who plan to register for the course 
Physiology and Biophysics must consult the 
field representative before the start of the sec- 
ond trimester. Students who want to take any of 
the third-trimester courses (numbered 2-8) are 
advised to consult the field representative no 
later than the seventh week of the second tri- 
mester in order to assure a place in the course. 

1. Physiology and Biophysics Lectures and 
conferences in body fluids, bioelectric phenom- 



24 Instruction — Medical College Division 



ena, circulation, respiration, and gastrointestinal 
function. Second trimester, four hours each 
week. The staff. 

Lectures and conferences on kidney function, 
acid-base regulation, endocrinology, and metab- 
olism; and a weekly laboratory on selected 
aspects of physiology. Third trimester, eleven 
hours each week. The staff. 

2. Respiratory and Renal Mechanisms of Reg- 
ulation of Acid-Base Balance Each session 
consists of an informal lecture and a succeeding 
seminar discussion based on assigned reading 
in the area of the lecture. Third trimester: three 
hours each week. Five to fifteen students. 

3. Selected Topics in Endocrinology Impor- 
tant scientific papers dealing with certain 
aspects of endocrinology are distributed to the 
participants one week in advance of discussion. 
Each paper is considered in detail in a seminar 
directed by an investigator in the area under 
discussion. One or two preliminary orientation 
sessions are given by Professor Greif before 
distribution of the first scientific paper, and, if 
feasible, one or two laboratory days are 
planned. Third trimester: three hours each week. 
Six to twelve students. R. L. Greif and staff. 



4. Selected Topics in Gastrointestinal and He- 
patic Physiology and Pathophysiology Topics 
include bilirubin metabolism and excretion, 
cholesterol metabolism, bile salt excretion, bile 
formation, esophageal motility, gastric function, 
intestinal cell turnover, absorption of fat, ab- 
sorption of carbohydrate, the malabsorption 
syndrome. Third trimester: two hours each 
week. Six to twelve students. N. B. Javitt. 



5. Selected Topics in Respiratory Physiology 

Topics covered include: (1) physiological anat- 
omy of the lung; (2) logical formulation and 
solution of clinical problems; (3) ventilation, 
alveolar air diagram, nitrogen washout; (4) rel- 
evant lung function tests: (5) lung volumes, 
effect of posture and disease; (6) diffusion, Fick 
equation, Bohr integration; (7) acid-base con- 
siderations in blood; (8) mechanical properties 
of lung; (9) ventilation-perfusion ratio and Bohr 
integral isopleths; (10) ecology, sealed spaces, 
altitude, diving; (11) lung function in the first 
week of life. Students who want to take this 
course must consult Professor Briscoe no later 
than the seventh week of the second trimester. 
Third trimester: two hours each week. Maximum 
of twelve students. W. A. Briscoe. 




Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 25 



6. Selected Topics in Kidney and Electrolyte 
Physiology and Pathophysiology Lectures, 
seminars, and demonstrations. Topics include: 
(1) GFR, clearance concept, reabsorption and 
secretion of electrolytes; (2) concentrating 
mechanism; (3) electrophysiology of the neph- 
ron; (4) pathyphysiology of potassium; (5) renal 
blood flow and its intrarenal distribution; (6) 
renal physiology in the newborn; (7) control of 
body fluid volume and tonicity; (8) pathology of 
renal failure; urinary sediment; pathophysiology 
of renal failure; (9) radiology of the kidneys; (10) 
dialysis; (11) transplantation. Third trimester: 
two hours each week. Maximum of twelve 
students. E. Windhager and staff. 

7. Special Topics in Cardiovascular Physiology 

Original research papers will be made available 
in advance of each session, and these and the 
general problems associated with each topic 
will serve as the basis for the discussion. Insofar 
as possible, experimental approaches to each 
problem will be demonstrated. To some extent, 
choice of topics can be determined by the inter- 
ests of the group. Probable topics include: (1) 
regulation of peripheral blood flow; (2) inte- 
grated cardiovascular responses to hypoxia; (3) 
pulsatile flow in arteries; (4) measures of myo- 
cardial performance; (5) blood volume, hem- 
orrhage, and hemorrhagic shock; (6) cardiac 
catherization in man, congenital heart disease, 
valvular heart disease. Third trimester: three 
hours each week. Si,x to twelve students. C. Fell. 

8. Neurobiology Elective Described under 
courses offered by the Field of Neurobiology 
and Behavior. 

Instruction at the 
Sloan-Kettering Division 

1. Graduate Seminar This weekly graduate 
seminar is offered each year. During the first 
trimester, second-year students will present 
brief reports on their research experiences in 
the laboratory rotations. First year students may 
report on laboratory rotations, review a selected 
area of research or critically review a research 
paper. The discussion is carried out principally 
by graduate students under the guidance of their 
major (temporary or permanent) sponsors. From 
time to time outstanding authorities are invited 
as guest speakers. In addition, students in their 
third and later years of graduate study, address 
the seminars on the progress being made in 
their thesis work. 

2. Laboratory Rotations Throughout the year 
students should spend time in research labora- 
tories. Arrangements for laboratory rotation 
should be made with the major sponsor. 



3. Minor Projects Two minor projects are 
required of all students. The major sponsor 
assumes the responsibility for monitoring the 
time spent on the project. Minors should be 
completed before the Admission to Candidacy 
Examination. 

4. Laboratory Safety and Biohazards Course 

All students are required to take by their second 
year the course of six basic lectures sponsored 
by the Sloan-Kettering Institute Institutional 
Biosafety Committee. The series covers general 
laboratory safety, the use of radioisotopes, car- 
cinogens, primary and secondary barrier 
systems, contamination control, and hazards 
associated with research animals, and is sup- 
plemented by lectures on special topics given 
throughout the year. 

Biochemistry 

Faculty 

N. W. Alcock, L. H. Augenlicht, I. Balazs. M. E. 
Balis. F. C. Bancroft, R. S. Bockman, E. Boren- 
freund. L. F. Cavalieri, C. Cunningham-Rundles. 
Z. Darzynkiewicz. Ann M. Dnistrian. D. B. Donner. 
M. Fleisher, J. J. Fox. L. T. Friedhoff. A. Giner- 
Sorolla. S. Green. M. G. Hamilton, U. Hammer- 
ling, P. J. Higgins. L. Kopelovich. W. Kreis. K. 
O. Lloyd, P. W. Melera, M. J. Modak, A. C. Moore. 
J. S. Nisselbaum. B. A. Otter, J. C. Parham. J. 
Roberts, B. H. Rosenberg, A. S. Schneider, M. 
K. Schwartz, G. C. Sen, M. R. Sherman. V. P. 
Skipski. M. Sonenberg. G. Stohrer. P. P. Trotta. 

5. S. Witkin. L C. Yip 

Unit Chairperson 

U. Hammerling, Sloan-Kettering Division. 
Kettering Laboratory. Room 321, (212) 794-7522 

Opportunities are available for advanced work 
and research in molecular biology, chemical 
carcinogenesis and cell transformation, differen- 
tiation research, mechanisms of hormone action, 
membrane structure and function, development 
and mechanism of action of anti-tumor agents. 

Undergraduate requirements for a major in bio- 
chemistry include courses in inorganic chem- 
istry, qualitative and quantitative chemistry, or- 
ganic chemistry, physical chemistry, physics, 
general biology and mathematics (through cal- 
culus). Any of these requirements not completed 
at the undergraduate level must be completed 
during graduate study. 

Graduate Record Examination scores in both 
the Aptitude Test (verbal and quantitative) and 
the Advanced Test in chemistry or biology are 
required. 

Students electing biochemistry as a major or 
minor subject must complete the first term of 
the Graduate Biochemistry course and the Ad- 
vanced Biochemistry course as minimal require- 
ments. Two minor subjects are required. 



26 Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 



Students may be required to take an oral quali- 
fying examination. A written examination may be 
required at the discretion of the student's Special 
Committee. The Admission to Candidacy Exami- 
nation is both written and oral. 

The only language requirements are those im- 
posed by the student's Special Committee. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

N. W. Alcock: trace metals; parenteral nutrition 
L. H. Augenlicht: transcriptional control, 
eukaryotes 

I. Balazs: RNA characterization; transcription 
and translation in man-mouse cell hybrids 

M. E. Balis: enzyme regulation; purine metab- 
olism 

F. C. Bancroft: regulation of gene expression in 
eukaryotes 

R. S. Bockman: parathyroid action, hypercal- 
cemia and carcinogenesis 

E. Borenfreund: biochemical genetics; chemical 
carcinogenesis 

L. F. Cavalieri: reverse transcriptase; macro- 
molecules 

C. Cunningham-Rundles: molecular aspects of 
immunity; HLA composition; B-cell receptors 

Z. Darzynkiewicz: differentiation and carcino- 
genesis 

A. M. Dnistrian: membrane composition and 
carcinogenesis 

D. B. Donner: hormone action; cell surface 
regulation 

M. Fleisher: tumor-associated antigens; clinical 

chemical automation 
J. J. Fox: development of antitumor and antiviral 

chemicals 

L. T. Friedhoff: membrane potential and receptor 
regulation 

A. Giner-Sorolla: synthesis of antitumor and 
antiviral chemicals; carcinogenesis 

S. Green: isolation of tumor necrotizing factor, 
macrophage enzymes 

M. G. Hamilton: eukaryotic ribosomes; character- 
ization of nucleic acids and proteins 

U. Hammerling: differentiation of lymphocytes; 
immunochemistry of T- and B-cells 

P. J. Higgins: comparative biochemistry of em- 
bryonic and neoplastic development 

L. Kopelovich: chromosomal proteins, nucleic 
acids, and neoplastic transformation 

W. Kreis: biochemical pharmacology; biochem- 
istry of macromolecules 

K. O. Lloyd: immunochemistry; melanoma and 
ovarian antigens 

P. W. Melera: growth and differentiation; bio- 
chemistry of RNA 

M. J. Modak: DNA polymerase; reverse tran- 
scriptase; oncogenic viruses 

A. C. Moore: regulation of membrane structure 
and function 

J. S. Nisselbaum: mechanism of enzyme activity: 
isozymes 

B. A. Otter: synthesis of antitumor compounds 
J. C. Parham: chemical carcinogenesis; photo- 
chemistry; synthesis of antitumor drugs 



J. Roberts: enzyme therapy and nutritional 

deprivation of neoplasms 
B. H. Rosenberg: mechanism and control of DNA 

synthesis 

A. S. Schneider: cell surface receptor regulation 
of hormone and neurotransmitter release 

M. K. Schwartz: antigens, hormones, and en- 
zymes in cancer detection; automated clinical 
biochemistry 

G. C. Sen: regulation of gene expression in 
eukaryotic cells 

M. R. Sherman: mechanicm of steroid hormone 
action 

V. P. Skipski: lipid metabolism and malignancy 
M. Sonenberg: mechanism of peptide hormone 
action; ligand control of membrane structure 
and function 
G. Stohrer: carcinogenesis and cell differentia- 
tion 

P. P. Trotta: adenosine deaminase, growth and 

differentiation 
S. S. Witkin: carcinogenesis and embryogenesis 
L. C. Yip: enzymes in purine metabolism, aging. 

carcinogenesis 



Courses 

1. Biochemistry The course and hours are de- 
scribed on p. 35 under Interdivisional Courses. 

2. Advanced Biochemistry The course and 
hours are described on p. 35 under Interdivi- 
sional Courses. 

3. Physical Methods The course and hours are 
described on p. 35 under Interdivisional 
Courses. 

Biophysics 

Faculty 

l_. L. Anderson, J. R. Bading, R. E. Bigler, J. 
Fried. A. S. Gelbard, J. H. Kim, J. S. Laughlin, R. 
Mohan, W. G. Myers, G. A. Russ, B. Schmall, 
H. Weiss. L. Zeitz 

Unit Chairperson 

J. S. Laughlin, Sloan-Kettering Division, 
Schwartz Hall, Room SM-11, (212) 794-7413 

Graduate work is offered leading to the Ph.D. 
degree in biophysics and the M.S. degree in 
radiation physics. A candidate for the Ph.D. must 
have a B.A. or B.S. degree with a major in 
physics, or with a major in biology, chemistry, or 
mathematics and a minor in physics. A candidate 
for the M.S. must have a B.A. or B.S. in physics 
from a recognized university. 

Graduate Record Examination scores in both 
the Aptitude Test (verbal and quantitative) and 



Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 27 



the Advanced Test in physics, mathematics, 
chemistry, or biology are required. 

Undergraduate prerequisites for the Ph.D. candi- 
date include courses in general physics, elec- 
tricity and magnetism, mechanics, mathematics 
(through calculus), and thermodynamics, and 
acceptable laboratory experience in these sub- 
jects. Any of those requirements not completed 
at the undergraduate level must be completed 
during graduate study. Graduate course work 
required for the Ph.D. is flexible, depending 
upon the student's background and basic in- 
terests, but ordinarily would include advanced 
courses in areas of physics, biology, biochem- 
istry, and mathematics and courses in the 
student's minor subjects. In addition, a month 
spent full time on a laboratory project is required 
in each of the two minor disciplines. 

Students may be required to pass a qualifying 
examination covering various basic aspects of 
their major and minor subjects and must pass 
the Admission to Candidacy Examination. The 
thesis required for the Ph.D. in biophysics should 
demonstrate the ability of the student to make a 
thorough and original investigation in an im- 
portant area of biophysics. There is no manda- 
tory foreign language requirement. 

Some of the research projects in biophysics 
that are pertinent to the Ph.D. program include: 
methods of production of radionuclides using a 
biomedical cyclotron, synthesis of labeled com- 
pounds, and their use for in vivo metabolic 
studies; the mechanism of radiation action on 
bacteria and small animals, including metabo- 
lism studies with human and other tumors in- 
fluenced by radiation under different environ- 
mental conditions; fundamental radiobiological 
studies of mammalian cells in tissue culture and 
study of the early radiation-induced processes 
in cells using high-intensity pulsed irradiation 
techniques; effects of chemotherapeutic agents 
on celi survival and progression through the cell 
cycle; application to the treatment of human 
leukemia; the measurement of radiation by 
calorimetric, chemical, and solid-state tech- 
niques; the measurement of bone mineral con- 
tent in the human. 

A candidate for the M.S. must have a B.A. or 
B.S. in physics from a recognized university and 
have completed undergraduate courses in gen- 
eral physics, mechanics, electronics, electricity 
and magnetism, modern physics, and mathe- 
matics through differential equations. The can- 
didate is expected to satisfactorily pass courses 
selected from some of the following subjects: 
physics, biophysics, biology, radiobiology, bio- 
chemistry, and biomathematics and must minor 
in one of those subjects other than physics. The 
thesis subject must be in the field of radiation 
physics and must represent a comprehensive 
study demonstrating a thorough knowledge of 
the chosen subject. A final oral examination will 
be given, primarily on the subject of the thesis, 
and may be preceded by a written examination 



covering the fundamental principles of the 
course work. There is no mandatory foreign 
language requirement. 

The course of study leading to the M.S. degree 
in radiation physics trains physicists in the vari- 
ous aspects of production, measurement, and 
application of radiation to various medical and 
biological problems. These problems particularly 
involve the use of radiation in the diagnosis and 
treatment of cancer. A variety of radiation 
sources is available, capable of generating pho- 
tons and electrons with energies ranging from 
5 Kev to 25 Mev and with electron dose-rates up 
to 10 u rads per second. Experience also is pro- 
vided in the handling and use of many different 
radioisotopes. The magnitude and variety of 
facilities and unique radiation projects at the 
Sloan-Kettering Institute and the Memorial Hos- 
pital are particularly pertinent for training in this 
area. An important feature is the coexistence of 
fundamental research and practical and clinical 
applications in the same center. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

L. L. Anderson: radiation dosimetry 

J. R. Bading: quantitative imaging in extraction 

of physiologic information 
R. E. Bigler: in vivo neutron activation analysis 
J. Fried: cytotoxic agents and the cell cycle: 

flow cytofluorometry 

A. S. Gelbard: enzymatic synthesis of com- 
pounds labeled with short-lived isotopes 

J. H. Kim: hyperthermia, radiation and drug 
actions on cell systems 

J. S. Laughlin: metabolic studies with radio- 
nuclide labeled compounds 

R. Mohan: computer applications in radiation 
therapy 

W. G. Myers: radiopharmaceuticals, history of 
nuclear medicine 

G. A. Russ: chemistry and metabolism of short- 
lived labeled compounds 

B. Schmall: syntheses and use of radio- 
pharmaceuticals 

H. Weiss: fast time processes in biophysics and 
radiobiology 

L. Zeitz: mechanisms of damage and repair in 
mammalian cells 



Courses 

1. Radiological Physics Lectures and prob- 
lems. A series of hourly lectures and assigned 
problems in applied mathematics, fundamentals 
of radiation physics, x-ray and radium treatment 
planning, diagnostic x-ray principles, radiation 
protection, and uses of radioactive isotopes. 
Hours by arrangement. 

2. Radiobiology A semester course in funda- 
mental radiobiology dealing with the effects of 



28 Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 



radiation on cells, viruses, and macromolecules. 
as well as on whole animals. The course also 
covers areas of radiation physics and radiation 
chemistry pertinent to radiobiology. 

3. Advanced Biophysics Laboratory courses in 
each of the topics of radiation biophysics. Hours 
by arrangement. 

4. Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry A tutorial 
course in radiopharmaceutical chemistry is of- 
fered for those students majoring or minoring in 
this subject. Hours by arrangement. 

5. Biophysics Colloquia Reports on research 
in progress by faculty and outside lecturers. 
Required for majors in biophysics. Hours by 
arrangement. 

Biostatistics 

Faculty 

D. W. Braun, Jr., N. L Geller, M. L Lesser, V. 
Mike, H. T. Thaler 

Unit Chairperson 

V. Mike, Sloan-Kettering Division, Schwartz 
Hall, Room 724, (212) 794-7546 

Graduate work is offered leading to the Ph.D. 
degree in biostatistics. The program is designed 
to provide strong training in statistical theory 
and methodology and in statistical computing, 
combined with broad experience in data analysis 
and in collaborative research with biomedical 
investigators. 

For admission to the program an applicant must 
have a baccalaureate degree in mathematics, 
statistics, or the equivalent. Graduate Record 
Examination scores in both the Aptitude Test 
(verbal and quantitative) and the Advanced Test 
in mathematics are ordinarily required. The stu- 
dent is expected to take the courses recom- 
mended by the Special Committee, satisfy two 
minor field requirements, participate in an in- 
ternship program, and complete a dissertation. 
A written qualifying examination and the Admis- 
sion to Candidacy Examination must be passed. 
There is no foreign language requirement, but 
proficiency in at least one computer program- 
ming language is expected. 

Formal course work covers probability theory, 
statistical inference, and statistical computing. 
There is special emphasis on the design and 
analysis of clinical trials, and the development 
of skills in exploratory data analysis. The con- 
figuration of courses to be completed by each 
student will be determined by the Special Com- 
mittee, after consideration of the student's aca- 
demic background and research interests. 

For the two minor fields the student may select 
from computer science, advanced probability. 



genetics, pharmacology, or any other area of 
study offered by the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences. These minor fields may afford the stu- 
dent an opportunity to spend time working in a 
biological research laboratory. 

Each student participates in an internship pro- 
gram in statistical consulting and collaborative 
research. General consulting is an important 
aspect of the work of a professional biostatis- 
tician. The student initially sits in on consulting 
sessions, then begins taking on such assign- 
ments under faculty supervision. He or she may 
also become involved in long-term collaborative 
research projects. The internship schedule will 
be arranged for each student by the Special 
Committee. 

A doctoral dissertation in statistics involves the 
development of new theory or methodology un- 
der the direction of a faculty advisor. In this 
program, the student also has the option of 
working jointly with a statistician and a biomedi- 
cal investigator. The thesis is then developed in 
response to a problem under investigation at this 
medical center, and the student is expected to 
demonstrate an ability to master the issues per- 
taining to an area of research in which he or she 
has no prior training, by interacting with an 
established scientist. 

The main responsibility for thesis guidance, 
however, is always carried by the statistical 
sponsor. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

D. W. Braun, Jr.: survival analysis; statistical 

computing; genetics 
N. L. Geller: probability theory; nonparametric 

inference; data analysis 
M. L. Lesser; nonparametric inference; clinical 

trials; epidemiology 
V. Mike: robust inference; epidemiology; 

genetics 

H. T. Thaler: applied probability; data analysis; 
statistical graphics 

Courses 

Note: Courses 1-3 will be given in 1981-82. 
Courses 4-8 will be given for the first time in 
1982-83. 

I. Biostatistics I: Introduction to Statistical Rea- 
soning It is the aim of this course to help 
participants gain some insight into the theory 
underlying a probabilistic approach to the treat- 
ment of observational or experimental data, and 
to acquaint them with the most basic techniques 
of statistical analysis. First trimester. M. L. 
Lesser. 

2. Biostatistics II: Experimental Design and 
Curve Fitting Application of concepts intro- 
duced in Biostatistics I to the analysis of 



Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 29 



scientific data. Topics include statistical design 
of experiments, analysis of variance, correlation, 
and linear regression. Second trimester. N. L. 
Geller. 

3. Exploratory Data Analysis Tabular and 
graphical representations of data; stem-and-leaf 
diagrams, box plots, multidimensional methods; 
data reduction; transformations and smoothing; 
resistant analyses of structured data; diagnostic 
use of residuals. Third trimester. Staff. 

4. Probability Theory Discrete and continuous 
probability spaces; combinatorial analysis; 
random variables; distribution functions; inde- 
pendence and conditional probability; generat- 
ing and characteristic functions; Markov chains; 
martingales; laws of large numbers; central limit 
theorems; measure theoretic concepts. Three 
trimesters. 

5. Statistical Inference Nature of statistical 
inference; sampling, data collection, sampling 
distributions and hypothesis testing; Neyman- 
Pearson lemma, maximum likelihod, sufficiency, 
Bayesian inference; regression and analysis of 
variance, experimental design; distribution-free 
methods. Three trimesters. 

6. Statistical Computing Introduction to sci- 
entific computing; high-level languages; math- 
ematical and statistical software; data structures 
and data base management systems. Hands-on 
experience with modern computing equipment. 
Three trimesters. 

7. Survival Analysis and Clinical Trials Para- 
metric and nonparametric models of survival 
times, exponential and Weibull distributions; 
life-table and Kaplan-Meier estimates; design of 
randomized clinical trials, concomitant var- 
iables, stratification, sample size determination; 
2- and k-sample techniques for censored data; 
generalized Wilcoxon and log-rank tests, Cox 
regression. Two trimesters. 

8. Analysis of Categorical Data Two- and 
higher-way contingency tables; hypergeometric 
and multi-nomial distributions; approximate 
methods; logistic models; combination and 
comparison of contingency tables; binary re- 
gression. One trimester. 



The following courses will be offered in subse- 
quent years. 

Advanced Statistical Inference 
Advanced Statistical Computing 
Stochastic Processes 
Time Series Analysis 
Linear Models 



Cell Biology 

Faculty 

J. L. Biedler, Z. Darzynkiewicz, E. deHarven, E. 
E. Deschner, G. B. Dooher, M. Eisinger, D. P. 
Evenson, J. E. Fogh, E. A. Friedman, M. R. 
Melamed, M. A. S. Moore, R. H. F. Peterson, A. 
E. Silverstone, H. W. Snyder Jr., M. Spiegelman, 
S. S. Sternberg, L. Thomas, S.S. Wachtel, 
N. T. Williams 

Unit Chairperson 

June L. Biedler, Walker Laboratory, Room 2131 . 
(914) 698-1100, Ext. 243 

The program in Cell Biology offers opportunities 
for advanced study of the structure and function 
of normal and transformed eukaryotic cells. 
Through multidisciplinary approaches research 
is oriented toward the analysis of growth and 
differentiation processes. Research tcehniques 
and methodologies include light and electron 
microscopy, cell separation, fractionation and 
purification, cell culture, cytochemistry, flow 
cytometry and enzymology. 

Students will spend their first year in: 1) satis- 
fying course and seminar requirements; 2) par- 
ticipating in laboratory rotations; and 3) initiation 
one or two minor projects. The Unit Chairman 
will serve as temporary major advisor during 
this time. At the end of the first year the student's 
performance will be reviewed and a Special 
Committee of three members will be selected. 
The Special Committee membership must pro- 
vide multidisciplinary academic backgrounds. 

During the second academic year students 
should complete two minor projects, satisfy the 
requirements of the Admission to Candidacy 
Examination and initiate a thesis project. 

Prerequisites for a major in Cell Biology include 
courses in chemistry (through organic), bio- 
chemistry, physics, mathematics (through cal- 
culus) and general biological sciences (botany, 
zoology, microbiology, cell biology); physical 
chemistry is recommended. Any of the require- 
ments not completed at the undergraduate level 
must be completed prior to entering the pro- 
gram or during the first year of graduate study. 

Graduate Record Examinations in both the Apti- 
tude Test (verbal and quantitative) and the Ad- 
vanced Test in biology or chemistry are required. 

Programs will be determined individually on the 
basis of interest and prior experience. Students 
are expected to have knowledge of materials 
offered in the courses entitled, microscopic 
anatomy and eukaryotic cell biology. Exemption 
from the courses can be granted following the 
successful completion of a written examination. 
Students majoring in cell biology may be advised 
to register for courses in molecular biology, 
genetics, biochemistry and biostatistics. 



30 Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

J. L. Biedler: somatic cell genetics and on- 
cogenic potential 

Z. Darzynkiewicz: differentiation and carcino- 
genesis 

E. deHarven: infrastructure of cells, viruses and 

cell surfaces 
E. E. Deschner: proliferation and differentiation 

of gastrointestinal epithelium 

G. B. Dooher: surface and fine structure analysis 
of mouse spermatozoa 

M. Eisinger: metastases and cell culture 

D. P. Evenson: ultrastructure of RNA and DNA 
and RNA tumor virus 

J. E. Fogh: cancer cell biology and virology 

E. A. Friedman: growth and differentiation of 
normal and preneoplastic cells 

M. R. Melamed: cytophysics and cytochemistry 

M. A. S. Moore: multipotential stem cells; 
granulopoiesis 

R. H. F. Peterson; malignancy; plasma mem- 
brane composition 

A. E. Silverstone: molecular biology of the initial 
phase of chemical carcinogenesis; DNA 
polymerases 

H. W. Snyder Jr.: murine leukemia surface 
proteins 

M. Spiegelman: cell-cell interactions and em- 
bryonic development in mice 

S. S. Sternberg: pathology and drug toxicity 

L. Thomas: microbial toxins and mycoplasma 

S. S. Wachtel: immunogenetics 

N. T. Williams: differentiation and maturation of 
hematopoietic stem cells 



Courses 

1. Eukaryotic Cell Biology A basic introductory 
course with primary emphasis on the methods 
applied in modern cell biology research and on 
fundamental aspects of cell organization, dif- 
ferentiation, and transformation. Staff. 

2. Current Topics in Cell Biology An advanced 
course in cell biology given with the participa- 
tion of the Sloan-Kettering Division staff and 
several invited guest speakers. Topics will in- 
clude protein synthesis, secretion, phagocytosis, 
lysosomes, cell surface organization, cyto- 
skeleton, cell cycle, cell division, cell move- 
ments, etc. Staff. 

3. Microscopy for Cancer Research A labora- 
tory course. An introduction to the morphology 
of cancer cells with a double emphasis: 1) ad- 
vanced methods in microscopy and 2) human 
cancer pathology. Sessions consist of lectures 
and/or demonstrations, followed by a laboratory 
in which students will examine microscopic 
slides (microscopes will be provided). Methods 
of light microscopy (autoradiography, enzyme- 
cytochemistry, immunofluorescence, etc.), as 
well as electron microscopy (transmission, 



scanning, high resolution, etc.) emphasized. 
Approximately half of the sessions deal with the 
pathology of human neoplastic tissue (leukemia, 
breast cancer, hepatoma, etc.). Third trimester. 
E. deHarven, S. S. Sternberg, and staff. 

4. Flow Cytometry This brief course will in- 
clude lectures and demonstrations on the 
principles of cell measurements and sorting as 
they are applied to basic cell biology, with 
special emphasis on nucleic acid content, cell 
cycle analysis, differentiation and transforma- 
tion. Z. Darzynkiewicz and staff. 

5. Cell Culture Techniques Short-term course 
in tissue culture techniques for a limited number 
of students at the Walker Laboratory in Rye. 
Each course, with two students in attendance, 
will run for a two-week period. 

The course work will include the theoretical and 
practical aspects of tissue culture with demon- 
strations and practice. It will cover general and 
special techniques as they apply to various 
fields of cancer research. Methods of prevention 
and detection of tissue culture contaminants will 
be demonstrated. J. Fogh. 

6. Cell Biology Journal Club A weekly informal 
discussion of recent publications of corHmon 
interest in cell biology. 



Genetics and Molecular Biology 

Faculty 

K. Artzt, L. H. Augenlicht, I. Balazs, F. C. 
Bancroft, D. Bennett, Y. Ben-Shaul, P. Besmer, 
J. L. Biedler, R. S. K. Chaganti, R. K. Cross, B. 
Dupont, E. Fleissner, E. A. Friedman, P. J. 
Gomatos, J. A. Gurr, M. G. Hamilton, W. D. Hardy 
Jr., P. J. Higgins, I. A. Kourides, R. M. Krug, P. 
W. Melera, M. J. Modak, P. V. O'Donnell, A. 
Pinter, O. Prakash, W. Prensky, N. H. Sarkar, G. 
C. Sen. M. R. Sherman, A. E. Silverstone, M. 
Siniscalco, H. W. Snyder Jr., E. Stavnezer, J. 
Stavnezer, J. S. Tung 

Unit Chairperson 

F. C. Bancroft, Sloan-Kettering Division, Howard 
Laboratory, Room 910, (212) 794-8131 

This program offers an opportunity to do ad- 
vanced research at the molecular level in 
various research areas, including eukaryotic 
gene structure and function, viral gene expres- 
sion, viral and chemical carcinogenesis, de- 
velopmental and somatic cell genetics, cell 
growth and differentiation, mechanisms of hor- 
mone action, and immunogenetics. The courses 
offered are designed to equip students with a 
detailed understanding of modern concepts in 



Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 31 



genetics, virology and molecular biology and the 
ways in which these are brought to bear on 
the cancer problem. 

A good background in genetics and biochemistry 
is required of students. Graduate Record Ex- 
aminations in both the aptitude test (verbal and 
quantitative) and the advanced test in biology 
or chemistry are also required. Course work in 
the first year of graduate study is decided upon 
by students in consultation with advisors pro- 
vided by the Unit. Some courses in other units 
of the Sloan-Kettering Division may be recom- 
mended, depending on the individual student's 
background. All students are also required to 
take three seminar courses and to carry out 
minor research projects in laboratories other 
than that of their major sponsor. A rotation pro- 
gram exists to aid students in choosing their 
major thesis topic and sponsor. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

K. Artzt: cell surfaces and tumorigenesis in early 

mouse embryogenesis 
L. H. Augenlicht: transcriptional control, 

eukaryotes 

I. Balazs: RNA characterization; transcription 
and translation in man-mouse cell hybrids 

F. C. Bancroft: expression and regulation of 
genes for growth hormone and prolactin, bio- 
synthesis and processing of mRNA precursors 

D. Bennett: developmental genetics and differ- 
entiation 

Y. Ben-Shaul: developmental genetics 

P. Besmer: structural and functional analysis of 
transforming genes of new feline sarcoma 
virus isolates; identification and characteriza- 
tion of feline leukemia virus-induced cellular 
transforming genes 

J. L. Biedler: somatic cell genetics and onco- 
genic potential 

R. S. Chaganti: cytogenetics and cancer 

R. K. Cross: viral genetics 

B. Dupont: human immunogenetics 

E. Fleissner: molecular, biological, and immuno- 
logical studies of murine leukemia viruses 

E. A. Friedman: growth and differentiation of 
normal and preneoplastic cells; tumor pro- 
gression in human colon 

P. J. Gomatos: biochemistry and genetics of 
animal viruses and transformed cells 

J. A. Gurr: thyroid stimulating hormone; regula- 
tion of gene expression 

M. G. Hamilton: eukaryotic ribosomes; char- 
acterization of nucleic acids and proteins 

W. D. Hardy Jr.: feline lymphosarcoma (leu- 
kemia) 

P. J. Higgins: comparative biochemistry of em- 
bryonic and neoplastic development 

I. A. Kourides: hormonal regulation of thyroid 
stimulating hormone gene expression; 
^-endorphin in pituitary hormone regulation, 
behavior, and analgesia 

R. M. Krug: biochemistry of transcription, 
translation and viral replication 



P. V. Melera: regulatory mechanisms of eukary- 
otic gene expression; somatic cell gene 
amplification 

M. Modak: DNA polymerase; reverse tran- 
scriptase; oncogenic viruses 

P. V. O'Donnell: characterization of murine 
leukemia viruses; surface antigens and peptide 
analysis of glycoproteins 

A. Pinter: characterization of structure and func- 
tion of murine leukemia and sarcoma virus- 
coded proteins 

O. Prakash: enzymology of reovirus replication 

W. Prensky: molecular cytogenetics 

N. H. Sarkar: morphology of RNA oncogenic 
viruses 

G. Sen: regulation of gene expression in eukary- 
otic cells 

M. Sherman: mechanisms of steroid hormone 
action 

A. E. Silverstone: molecular biology of the initial 
phase of chemical carcinogenesis; DNA 
polymerases 

M. Siniscalco: somatic cell genetics 

H. W. Snyder: characterization of feline lympho- 
sarcoma and murine leukemia cell surface 
proteins 

E. Stavnezer: organization of eukaryotic 
genomes; regulation of RNA synthesis 

J. Stavnezer: studies by recombinant DNA tech- 
niques of structure and rearrangement of 
immunoglobulin genes 

J. S. Tung: biochemistry and immunogenetics of 
mouse cell surface antigens 



Courses 

1. Molecular Biology The course presents the 
fundamentals of eukaryote gene structure, ex- 
pression and regulation. Topics discussed 
include: DNA sequence organization, chromatin 
structure, viral and cellular RNA transcription, 
translation and its regulation, control of gene 
expression in model systems and molecular 
aspects of carcinogenesis. Third trimester. 

L. Augenlicht and staff. 

2. Advanced Genetics Designed to give the 
student a sound background in genetic theory; 
an in-depth consideration of the gene as a unit 
of heredity. First trimester. Alternate years. 
Offered 1981-82. D. Bennett. 

3. Molecular Virology A formal course in 
which major emphasis is placed on the basic 
mechanisms in the biology of all animal viruses, 
including RNA and DNA tumor viruses. The 
topics considered include virus structure and 
composition, assay of viruses and viral-specific 
products, transcription and replication of viral 
nucleic acids, translation of virus-specific pro- 
teins, assembly of viral particles, structural and 
functional alterations in viral-infected cells in- 
cluding transformation, pathogenesis of viral 



32 Instruction — Sloari-Kettering Division 



diseases, and viral genetics. Alternate years. 
Offered 1981-82. R. M. Krug. 

4. Molecular Biology of Neoplastic Transforma- 
tion This course will focus on current efforts 
to understand the neoplastic cell phenotype 
from a molecular point of view. The effects of 
RNA and DNA tumor viruses on host cells will be 
discussed, in particular the transformation and/ 
or differentiation blocks of defined cell lineages 
by certain agents. The nature and enzymatic 
specificities of viral gene products responsible 
for transformation will be compared with related 
products of normal cellular genes. The potential 
interaction of such products with regulatory 
systems controlling cell shape, adhesiveness, 
motility, and mitosis will be described, as well 
as the possible involvement of the same systems 
in nonviral neoplasias. At least part of the 
course will consist of student presentations on 
relevant subjects. Alternate years. Not offered 
1981-82. E. Fleissner and A. Silverstone. 

5. Advanced Molecular Genetics A seminar 
course for advanced students covering those 
areas of gene structure and expression in which 
rapid progress is being made. Third trimester. 
Staff. 



Immunology 

Faculty 

J. Abbott, R. S. Anderson, E. A. Boyse, H. E. 
Broxmeyer, J.-W. Chiao, Y. S. Choi, R. G. Coffey, 
C. Cunningham-Rundles, N. K. Day, M. A. B. de 
Sousa, B. Dupont, R. L. Evans, R. B. Faanes, 

G. Fernandes, R. A. Good, S. Gupta, J. W. 
Hadden, Y. Hirshaut, M. K. Hoffmann, G. Incefy, 
A. J. Kenyon, Y. B. Kim, P. W. Kincade, G. C. 
Koo. G. W. Litman. C. Lopez, V J. Merluzzi, 

H. F. Oettgen, L. J. Old, G. J. O'Neill, R. J. 
O'Reilly, R. Pahwa, S. Pahwa, C. D. Platsoucas, 
M. S. Pollack, P. M. Ralph, B. Safai, M. P. Scheid. 
T. M. Setcavage, J. Sethi, F.-W. Shen, E. M. 
Smithwick, J. Stavnezer, O. Stutman, K. A. 
Sullivan, S. S. Wachtel, S. S. Witkin 



Unit Chairperson 

Y. B. Kim, Sloan-Kettering Division, Walker 
Laboratory, Room 3107, (914) 698-1100, Ext. 262 

Opportunities are offered toward the Ph.D. de- 
gree in various areas of immunology. This 
includes the disciplines of immunobiology, im- 
munochemistry, immunogenetics, immuno- 
hematology, immunopathology, immunopharma- 
cology, serology, transplantation immunology, 
tumor immunology, immunotherapy, and clinical 
immunology. 



Undergraduate prerequisites for a major in im- 
munology include courses in inorganic chem- 
istry, organic chemistry, mathematics (through 
calculus), physics, and general biology, micro- 
biology, zoology or botany. Physical chemistry 
is recommended. Any of these requirements not 
completed at the undergraduate level must be 
completed during the first year of graduate 
study. 

Graduate Record Examinations in both Aptitude 
Tests and the Advanced Test in biology or 
chemistry are required. 

Programs are determined individually on the 
basis of interest, training, prior experience and 
consultation with the student's Special Commit- 
tee. The Unit has no fixed course work require- 
ments other than those set by the student's 
permanent Special Committee. However, all 
students majoring in the program are expected 
to take full advantage of the Unit's core program 
of formal courses as well as to participate in 
additional course offerings of the Sloan- 
Kettering Division, Medical College Division, 
and other institutions which best complement 
their previous background and fulfill their 
scholastic objectives. During the first year of 
residence prior to the selection of a permanent 
Special Committee, the Unit chairperson, acting 
as temporary major sponsor, in consultation 
with the other members of the temporary Special 
Committee will aid the student in making the 
appropriate program choices. However, it is the 
clear intention of the Unit that extensive formal 
course work should not interfere with participa- 
tion in the various other activities, such as 
rotations, tutorials and minicourses as well as 
seminars and lectures offered at Sloan-Kettering 
Institute and neighboring institutions. 

The permanent Special Committee is to be com- 
posed of three members of the faculty — two 
minor sponsors and a major sponsor as chair- 
person. Minor projects should be completed 
before the Admission to Candidacy Examination 
required by the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences. 



Special Interests of the Faculty 

J. Abbott: differentiation and cell surface 
antigens 

R. S. Anderson: impact of pollutants on immune 

systems of marine invertebrates; metabolism 

of carcinogens by invertebrates; comparative 

immunobiology 
E. A. Boyse: immunogenetics of the cell surface 
H. E. Broxmeyer: requlation of granulocyte and 

macrophage production in vivo and in vitro 

during health and leukemia 
J. W. Chiao: immunobiology of T lymphocytes 

in immunity and leukemia 
Y. S. Choi: immunochemistry of lymphocyte 

receptors 



Instruction — Sloan-Kettering Division 33 



R. G. Coffey: regulatory and effector hormones 

C. Cunningham-Rundles: immunochemistry of 
immune complexes; cell surface antigens; 
clinical immunology; enzyme-linked immuno- 
sorbant assay (ELISA) 

N. K. Day: complement and immune complexes 
in human cancer and feline leukemia; phy- 
togeny and biology of complement 

M. A. B. de Sousa: circulation of lymphocytes; 
iron and control of immune functions 

B. Dupont: human immunogenetics 

R. L. Evans: immunobiology of T cells; im- 
munoregulatory and cytotoxic activities 

R. B. Faanes: immunobiology — regulation of 
cytotoxic T cell development; suppressor cell 
activation and antigen antibody complex 
involvement 

G. Fernandes: animal models for nutrition and 
diseases of aging; mamary cancer, autoim- 
munity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes 

R. A. Good: nutrition and immunity, bone mar- 
row transplantation in mice, monkeys and 
man, thymus function, T and B cell differentia- 
tion, identification of lymphocyte populations 

S. Gupta: immunoregulation of T-cell responses; 
autologous MLR; T-cell subsets; cloning of T 
lymphocytes; immunodeficiency diseases 

J. W. Hadden: immunopharmacology; biochem- 
istry of lymphocyte and macrophage activa- 
tion; actions of immunotherapeutic agents 

Y. Hirshaut: human tumor antigens 

M. K. Hoffman: regulation of humoral immunity 
in mouse and man 

G. Incefy: In vitro human T lymphocyte differen- 
tiation, thymic hormones, thymus function, 
immunodeficiency diseases 

A. J. Kenyon: pathogenesis of lymphoprolifera- 
tive diseases 

Y. B. Kim: ontogeny of immune systems; on- 
togeny and regulation of NK/K cell systems 

P. W. Kincade: B lymphocyte differentiation; 
autoimmunity 

G. C. Koo: immunogenetics of surface antigens 
of lymphoid cells 

G. W. Litman: immunogenetics, protein struc- 
ture and function 

C. Lopez: resistance to Herpesvirus infections; 
anti-Herpesvirus chemotherapy 

V. J. Merluzzi: regulation of cellular immunity 
by antineoplastic and immunopharmacological 
agents 

H. F. Oettgen: definition of cancer cell surface 
antigens recognized by antibodies or cyto- 
toxic T cells; cancer immunotherapy 

L. J. Old: cancer immunology and immuno- 
therapy 

G. J. O'Neill: genetic control of the human com- 
plement components 
R. J. O'Reilly: microbial immunology 
R. Pahwa: T cell differentiation in man; biologi- 
cal activities of thymic stroma and thymic 
hormones 

S. Pahwa: human humoral immune response 
and its regulation by immunoregulatory 
lymphocytes 

C. D. Platsoucas: human regulatory and effector 



T cells; T-T cell hybrids 

M. S. Pollack: immunogenetics of human histo- 
compatibility alloantigens 

P. Ralph: macrophage cytotoxicity; leukemic 
cell lines; human Ig secretion 

B. Safai: characteristics of the epidermal cells 
and their differentiation; cutaneous T cell 
lymphomas 

M. P. Scheid: lymphocyte development; immuno- 
genetics, defects, therapy 

T. Setcavage: immunochemistry; ontogeny and 
regulation of immune system 

J. Sethi: detection, characterization and clinical 
evaluation of human tumor associated anti- 
gens; radioimmunodetection of occult infec- 
tions and tumors 

F.-W. Shen: immunogenetics of the mouse 

E. M. Smithwick: neutrophil function and metab- 
olism; clinical immunology and immunodefi- 
ciency disorders 

J. Stavnezer: molecular immunology: structure 
and functioning of immunoglobulin genes 

0. Stutman: cellular immunobiology; onco- 
genesis 

K. A. Sullivan: human lymphocyte subsets; cell- 
mediated lympholysis 

S. S. Wachtel: immunogenetics 

S. S. Witkin: retroviruses and breast cancer; 
autoimmune responses to spermatozoa; anal- 
ysis of immune complexes, complement and 
antibodies in cancer 

Courses 

Introductory Immunology, Advanced Immunol- 
ogy and Contemporary Topics in Immunology 
are offered as core formal course work every 
year. When appropriate, students will be en- 
couraged to participate in the Biochemistry, 
Genetics, Molecular Biology and Biostatistics 
courses. Cell Biology and Microscopic Anatomy 
should be considered by those students lacking 
a background in these areas. At present, par- 
ticipation in the graduate seminar course is 
required by the Division. 

1. Introduction to Immunology This course is 
appropriate for but not restricted to students 
who have had no formal training in immunology 
or who wish to review fundamentals in prepara- 
tion for the Advanced Immunology course. An 
overview of specific and nonspecific immunity, 
historical perspectives in immunology, cellular 
participants in immune responses, structure of 
immunoglobulins and cell surface receptors, 
molecular basis of antibody diversity, organiza- 
tion of lymphoid tissues and cell migration 
streams, phylogenetic perspectives on ver- 
tebrate immunity, specificity to immune re- 
sponses, methods for measuring humoral 
immune responses, immunogenetics and 
transplantation immunity, and methods for 
measuring cell-mediated immune responses are 



34 Instruction — Sloah-Kettering Division 



among the topics which will be considered. First 
trimester, P. W. Kincade, G. W. Litman, and staff. 

2. Advanced Immunology Lectures, discus- 
sions and assigned readings for in-depth studies 
to cover properties of antigens and antibodies; 
mechanism of antibody formation; phylogeny 
and ontogeny of the immune system; structural 
and functional aspects of the immune system; 
molecular basis of antibody and lymphocyte 
diversity; major histocompatibility complexes in 
man and animals; immunogenetics of differen- 
tiation; effector mechanisms of antibody and 
cell-mediated immunity; mechanisms of immune 
injuries; immunodeficiency diseases; regulation 
and control of the immune response; genetics 
and immunology of transplants and tumors. Pre- 
requisites for the course are at least one semes- 
ter or equivalent biochemistry and introductory 
immunology. Second trimester, Y. B. Kim, 

O. Stutman, and staff. 

3. Contemporary Topics in Immunology The 

course will deal with two to four topics per tri- 
mester. Individual sessions may consist of 
discussions of selected topics, covering current 
progress by staff, student and/or invited visitors. 
Topics will be selected by the Curriculum Com- 
mittee in consultation with staff. Prerequisites 
are the Introductory and Advanced Immunology 
courses or equivalent. Second and third tri- 
mesters. Staff. 

4. Laboratory Rotations, Tutorials and Mini- 
courses In order to become familiar with the 
various research programs which are available 
to students doing major or minor work in Im- 
munology the Unit advises entering students to 
participate in as many laboratory rotations, 
tutorials and minicourses as can be accom- 
modated into the first-year schedule. The lists 
and descriptions for laboratory rotations, tutorial 
programs and minicourses are available from 
the office of the Unit chairperson. Staff. 

5. Methods in Immunology Research Owing to 
the highly specialized nature of immunology 
and the wealth of technical expertise available 
at our institution, students majoring in Immunol- 
ogy are encouraged to become acquainted in 
the course of their studies with a variety of basic 
immunological methods and techniques. A list 

ot recommended techniques and procedures is 
available from the office of the Unit chair- 
person. Staff. 

Pharmacology and 
Experimental Therapeutics 

Faculty 

A. M. Albrecht, N. W. Alcock, P. L. Chello, T.-C. 
Chou, R. G. Coffey, J. J. Fox, A. Giner-Sorolla, 



J. W. Hadden, D. J. Hutchison, G. Incefy, 
W. Kreis, B. M. Mehta, H. Oettgen, B. A. Otter, 
J. C. Parham, R. H. F. Peterson, F. S. Philips, 
J. Roberts, G. A. Russ, A. E. Silverstone, F. M. 
Sirotnak, S. S. Sternberg, M. N. Teller, K. A. 
Watanabe, M. S. Zedeck 

Unit Chairperson 

F. M. Sirotnak, Sloan-Kettering Division, Ketter- 
ing Laboratory, Room 316, (212) 794-7952 

This graduate program emphasizes training in 
general pharmacology. The candidate receives 
advanced instruction and training in one or 
more of the following subspecialties: biochem- 
ical and molecular pharmacology, medicinal 
chemistry and biochemistry, cancer therapeu- 
tics,, immunopharmacology, carcinogenesis and 
toxicology and radiopharmacology. The latter 
part of the curriculum is devoted to individual 
research in an area selected by the candidate. 

Applicants must meet the general requirements 
for admission to the Sloan-Kettering Division. 
Graduates with a major in biology, chemistry or 
health sciences having adequate preliminary 
training in organic chemistry, physical chem- 
istry, biochemistry and physiology would be 
most qualified for graduate work in this unit. 
Training in statistics is recommended. Graduate 
Record Examinations in both the Aptitude Tests 
(verbal and quantitative) and the Advanced Test 
in biology or chemistry are required. 

Courses generally required for an advanced de- 
gree include Biochemistry, Microanatomy, 
Physiology, Neurosciences, Biostatistics and 
both General and Advanced Pharmacology. Stu- 
dents may receive credit for equivalent course 
work at other institutions. Students may also be 
required to take a number of electives and 
seminar and special topics course. Individual 
programs may vary as determined by the stu- 
dent's Special Committee composed of faculty 
members representing the major and minor 
fields of study. 

Special Interests of the Faculty 

A. M. Albrecht: folate metabolism regulation, 

antimetabolite therapy of cancer 
N. W. Alcock: trace metals, parenteral nutrition 
P. L. Chello: molecular therapeutics and phar- 
macology 

T.-C. Chou: molecular pharmacology and 

enzymology 
R. G. Coffey: regulatory and effector hormones 
J. J. Fox: nucleoside analog chemistry 
A. Giner-Sorolla: synthesis of antitumor and 

antiviral chemicals, carcinogenesis 
J. W. Hadden: immunopharmacology 
D. J. Hutchison: drug resistance, cytoregulation 

and microbiology 

G. Incefy: lymphocyte (T and B cells) differen- 
tiation 



Interdivisional Courses 35 



W. Kreis: biochemical pharmacology, biochem- 
istry of macromolecules 

B. H. Mehta: quantitative microbiology, genetics, 
pharmacokinetics 

H. Oettgen: immunotherapy 

B. A. Otter: synthesis of antitumor agents 
J. C. Parham: synthesis of antitumor agents, 

chemical carcinogenesis 
R. H. F. Peterson: malignancy, plasma mem- 
brane composition 

F. S. Philips: pharmacology of antitumor and 
carcinogenic agents 

J. Roberts: antitumor enzymes and nutritional 
deprivation of neoplasm 

G. A. Russ: radiopharmacology 

A. E. Silverstone: molecular carcinogenesis 
F. M. Sirotnak: molecular pharmacology and 

membrane transport of antimetabolites 
S. S. Sternberg: pathology of drug action 
M. N. Teller: aging, immunology, oncogenesis 
K. A. Watanabe: medicinal chemistry and bio- 
chemistry, pyrimidine nucleoside analogs 
M. S. Zedeck: mechanisms of chemical carcino- 
genesis; biochemistry of antitumor drugs 

Courses 

I. General Pharmacology (see Field of Phar- 
macology, Medical College Division). 

2. Advanced Pharmacology (Interdivisional). 
This course will amplify the general pharmacol- 
ogy course focusing on basic aspects such as 
drug metabolism, enzyme kinetics, pharmaco- 
kinetics, pharmacogenetics, receptors, chemo- 
therapy, drug resistance, membrane transport, 
toxicology and clinical pharmacology. 

3. Molecular Pharmacology (see Field of Phar- 
macology, Medical College Division). 

4. Immunopharmacology As a melding of phar- 
macology and immunology this course focuses 
on the mechanism of therapeutic immunologic 
regulation. Topics include: inflammatory and 
allergic processes; mechanism of cell activa- 
tion; mediated release and action; cyclic- 
nucleotides and prostaglandins; lymphokines. 
interferons and thymic hormones; immuno- 
toxicology; immunologic assays and uses of 
biologies and drugs for immunotherapy. A back- 
ground in immunology would be helpful but not 
required. Offered every second year. 

5. Pharmacology Seminar (Interdivisional). 
The content and format of this seminar course 
is determined each year on the basis of the 
research interests of the faculty and students. 

6. Special Topics Course (Interunit). This 
course is interdisciplinary and will expand the 
candidate's training in certain specialized areas 
such as pharmacologic effects on membrane 
structure and physiology, radiopharmacology. 
chemical carcinogenesis and medicinal bio- 
chemistry. 



Interdivisional Courses 



1. Biochemistry Offered by the staffs of the 
Field of Biochemistry, Medical College Division, 
and of the Biochemistry Unit, Sloan-Kettering 
Division. This course is designed to provide the 
student with a knowledge of the fundamentals 
of biochemistry and an appreciation of the 
molecular basis of biological phenomena. Grad- 
uate students in biochemistry are required to 
pass this course (or its equivalent) before pur- 
suing advanced courses. Fall and winter tri- 
mesters. M T Th F 1 1 -1 2. S. G. Powers, U. 
Hammerling, and staff. 

2. Advanced Biochemistry A course offered 
jointly by the faculties of the Medical College 
and Sloan-Kettering Divisions. The course con- 
sists of a series of lecture units (minicourses) 
covering topics such as size, shape, and struc- 
ture of macromolecules; molecular biology; 
information transfer; membrane structure and 
function; hormones; enzyme structure and func- 
tion; antimetabolites in chemotherapy; and 
other subjects of current research interests. 
These subjects are taught at an advanced level 
with particular attention to contributions of re- 
cent research. It is not essential that students 
take the lecture units in any particular sequence 
Minimal prerequisite: Biochemistry (described 
above) or its equivalent Winter and spring tri- 
mesters. L. H. Augenlicht, S. S. Tate, and staff. 

3. Physical Methods This course consists of a 
series of workshops including laboratory dem- 
onstrations and lectures and/or tutorials in 
physical techniques for the study of macro- 
molecular and cellular structure. Examples of 
techniques available for study are: hydro- 
dynamic and equilibrium methods, electron 
microscopy and other optical methods, res- 
onance methods, and separation techniques 
such as chromatography, electrophoresis, iso- 
electric focussing, affinity methods. Time and 
place must be arranged with the faculty mem- 
bers in charge. Prerequisites: Biochemistry or 
its equivalent and Physical Chemistry. First 
trimester. 

4. Advanced Immunology Lectures, discus- 
sions, and assigned readings cover properties of 
antigens and antibodies; mechanism of anti- 
body formation; phylogeny and ontogeny of the 
immune system; structural and functional as- 
pects of the immune system; effector mech- 
anisms of antibody- and cell-mediated immunity; 
complement and other amplification systems; 
mechanisms of immune injuries; regulation and 
control of the immune response; genetics and 
immunology of transplants and tumors. Labora- 
tory work will include the isolation, purification, 
quantitation, and characterization of antibodies; 
the critical measurement of antigen-antibodies 



36 Special Programs 



reactions, and the dynamics of the in vivo anti- 
body response. Minimal prerequisites for lecture 
and laboratory courses: at least one semester 
or the equivalent of biochemistry; Introduction 
to Immunology or the immunology section of 
Microbiology and an Introduction to Infectious 
Diseases offered each September by the Field 
of Microbiology. Next offering of laboratory 
courses to be announced. D. H. Sussdorf. Lec- 
ture course offered during second and third 
trimesters. Second trimester: Y. B. Kim, O. 
Stutman and staff. Third trimester: D. H. Suss- 
dorf and staff. 

Special Programs 
Ph.D.-M.D. Program 

Students enrolled in the Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences may be eligible for admission 
into the Ph.D.-M.D. Program, jointly sponsored 
by the Medicai College and the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences. This program is designed 
for those few graduate students whose teaching 
and research goals require the acquisition of 
the M.D. degree in addition to the Ph.D. degree. 
The program is not designed as an alternate 
path for students who have the M.D. degree as 
their primary goal, but who have not been ac- 
cepted by a medical school. Those who know, at 
the time of application to Cornell, that they want 
to pursue a course of study leading to both de- 
grees should apply to one of the M.D. -Ph.D. 
programs of the Medical College described be- 
low. Only students enrolled in the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences, or accepted for 
enrollment, may apply for admission to the 
Ph.D.-M.D. Program at Cornell University Medi- 
cal College. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applications to this program are ordinarily made 
after completion of the first year of study in the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences, although 
more advanced students may be considered. 
The deadline for application is February 1. 

To apply, the student must submit to the Ph.D.- 
M.D. Committee of the Graduate School of Medi- 
cal Sciences: 

1. A completed application for admission with 
advanced standing to Cornell University Medical 
College (obtainable from the Medical College 
Admissions Office). 

2. A plan of graduate study incorporating all re- 
quired course work of the first two years of the 
Medical College curriculum and endorsed by the 
student's Special Committee. 

3. Evidence of successful completion of at least 
two major medical school basic science courses 
(anatomical sciences, biochemistry, microbiol- 
ogy, pathology, pharmacology, physiology). 

4. Two letters of evaluation from faculty of the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences. 



The Ph.D.-M.D. Committee of the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences will review the stu- 
dent's credentials and will select from among 
the applicants those students to be considered 
by the Committee on Admissions of Cornell 
University Medical College. Only applicants who 
are found to be acceptable for admission to 
Cornell University Medical College by its Com- 
mittee on Admissions, after review of the appli- 
cation and a personal interview, will be accepted 
into the Ph.D.-M.D. Program. Final decisions will 
be made before June 1. 

Degree Requirements 

Students accepted in this program must fulfill 
the following requirements before admission to 
the third year clinical curriculum of the Medical 
College: 

1. Complete all required graduate courses and 
the remainder of the first two years of the medi- 
cal curriculum. The students must satisfy the 
academic requirements of the medical curricu- 
lum as these are determined by each of the de- 
partments of the first two years. 

2. Pass the Admission to Candidacy Examina- 
tion required by the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences. 

3. Complete the dissertation research; present 
and successfully defend an original thesis at 
the final examination for the Ph.D. degree. 

After satisfactory fulfillment of the required 
clinical rotations of the Cornell third-year medi- 
cal curriculum, these students may receive credit 
for their graduate studies to satisfy the elective 
requirements of the fourth-year medical curricu- 
lum and will then be recommended for award of 
the M.D. degree by Cornell University. 

While registered as a graduate student in the 
Ph.D.-M.D. program the student is subject to the 
tuition schedule of the Graduate School of Medi- 
cal Sciences. Upon completion of the require- 
ments for the Ph.D. degree, the student is regis- 
tered in the Medical College and is subject to 
the tuition schedule of the Cornell University 
Medical College. 



M.D. -Ph.D. Program 

Programs of study leading to the Ph.D. degree 
are available to (1) students entering Cornell 
University Medical College, (2) medical students 
already matriculated at the Medical College, and 
(3) resident physicians in hospitals affiliated with 
the Medical College. 

Entering Medical Students 

The applicant to this program for entering medi- 
cal students must apply to both the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College and the Graduate School 
of Medical Sciences and be accepted through 
the admissions procedures of both schools. 



Special Programs 37 



The purpose of this program is to expose the 
student to both medical and graduate disciplines 
from the outset. The student spends the first two 
years as a medical student studying the basic 
medical sciences and attending regular gradu- 
ate seminars. The summer months are spent in 
the laboratory learning experimental techniques 
and doing research. The third, fourth, and fifth 
years of the student's program are spent as a 
full-time graduate student and are devoted ex- 
clusively to laboratory research and writing the 
thesis. The sixth year of the program is spent as 
a medical student in clinical study. This six-year 
program represents the minimum time required 
to satisfy residence requirements of both the 
M.D. and Ph.D. degrees at Cornell University. 

Ordinarily an entering medical student accepted 
into the M.D. -Ph.D. program will initially register 
in both the Cornell University Medical College 
and the Graduate School of Medical Sciences. 
For the first and second years of the program, 
the student ordinarily will maintain registration 
as a full-time medical student. The student may 
accumulate residence credit in the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences for full-time gradu- 
ate study during the summer. 

During the third and fourth years of the M.D.- 
Ph.D. program, a student ordinarily will be regis- 
tered as a full-time graduate student. In general, 
a student will be registered in both the Cornell 
University Medical College and the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences during the last year 
of study for the Ph.D., which in most cases will 
be the fifth year of tl" : 3 program. During the final 
year of the program, usually the sixth year, a 
student will be registered only in the Cornell 
University Medical College. 

A student in the M.D. -Ph.D. program is liable for 
tuition to the school in which registered. During 
the year in which the student is registered in 
both the Cornell University Medical College and 
the Graduate School of Medical Sciences, the 
student will be liable for half the tuition to each 
school. 



Matriculated Medical Students 

A medical student enrolled in the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College may interrupt medical 
studies at any time to pursue full-time graduate 
study leading to the Ph.D. degree. The student 
must fulfill all regular requirements of the Grad- 
uate School of Medical Sciences. A maximum of 
two residence credits for basic sciences course 
work taken in the medical curriculum can be 
granted toward the Ph.D. degree after the stu- 
dent passes an evaluation examination. 

A medical student who elects to begin graduate 
work leading to the Ph.D. degree in the senior 
year of medical school may register in both the 
Cornell University Medical College and the Grad- 
uate School of Medical Sciences. The student 
begins his or her graduate didactic work during 
that year, and, ordinarily, the M.D. degree is 
granted at the end of that year. Research in the 
area of the Ph.D. thesis topic is begun during the 
fifth year. A two-year period of full-time research 
is a realistic minimum estimate for the time re- 
quired to execute the experimental and theoreti- 
cal work necessary to fulfill the requirements for 
the Ph.D. degree. 



Resident Physicians 

The resident physician may apply for admission 
to the Graduate School of Medical Sciences as 
a full-time graduate student working toward the 
Ph.D. Part-time graduate study is not permitted. 
A maximum of two residence credits for medi- 
cal school course work in the basic sciences 
can be granted toward the residence require- 
ments of the Ph.D. degree after the student 
passes an evaluation examination. 

Prospective applicants to these programs should 
communicate with the dean of the Graduate 
School of Medical Sciences. 



Cornell University 

Graduate School of Medical Sciences 



Register 



University Administration 

Frank H. T. Rhodes, President of the University 
W. Keith Kennedy, University Provost 
Thomas H. Meikle, Jr., Provost for Medical 
Affairs 

William G. Herbster, Senior Vice President 
W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 
William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus 
Affairs 

Robert T. Horn, Vice President, Treasurer, and 

Chief Investment Officer 
Robert M. Matyas, Vice President for Facilities 

and Business Operations 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public 

Affairs 

Alison P. Casarett, Vice Provost 

Larry I. Palmer, Vice Provost 

James W. Spencer, Vice Provost 

Walter J. Relihan, Jr., Secretary of the Corpora- 
tion and University Counsel 

Neal R. Stamp, Senior Counsel to the University 

Kenneth I. Greisen, Dean of the University 
Faculty 



Graduate School of 
Medical Sciences 

Administration 

Frank H. T. Rhodes, President of the University 
Alison P. Casarett, Dean of the Graduate School 
Julian R. Rachele, Dean of the Graduate School 

of Medical Sciences and Associate Dean of 

the Graduate School 
Richard A. Rifkind, Director, Sloan-Kettering 

Division 

Dorris J. Hutchison, Associate Director, Sloan- 
Kettering Division; Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences, As- 
sistant Dean of the Graduate School 

Faculty 

Joan Abbott, Assistant Professor of Immunology, 
B.A. 1954, Connecticut College; M.A. 1957, 
Washington University; Ph.D. 1965, University 
of Pennsylvania 

Alberta M. Albrecht, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics; 



B.S. 1951, Seton Hall College, Ph.D. 1961, 
Rutgers University 

Nancy W. Alcock, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S. 1949, University of Tas- 
mania (Australia); Ph.D. 1960, University of 
London (England) 

Fred H. Allen, Jr., Clnical Associate Professor 
of Pediatrics. A.B. 1934, Amherst College; 
M.D. 1938, Harvard University 

Vincent G. Allfrey, Adjunct Professor of 

Genetics. B.S. 1943, City College of New York; 
M.S. 1948, Ph.D. 1949, Columbia University 

Daniel R. Alonso, Associate Professor of Pathol- 
ogy. M.D. 1962, University of Cuyo (Argentina) 

Olaf S. Andersen, Associate Professor of Physi- 
ology. Candidatus Medicinae 1971, University 
of Copenhagen (Denmark) 

Lowell L. Anderson, Visiting Assistant Professor 
of Biophysics. B.S. 1953, Whitworth College; 
Ph.D. 1958, University of Rochester 

Robert S. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1961, Drexel University; M.S. 
1968, Hahnemann Medical College; Ph.D. 
1971, University of Delaware 

Karen Artzt, Associate Professor of Genetics & 
Molecular Biology. A.B. 1964, Ph.D. 1972, 
Cornell University 

Leonard H. Augenlicht, Assistant Professor of 
Biochemistry and Genetics & Molecular Biol- 
ogy. B.A. 1967, State University of New York 
at Binghamton; Ph.D. 1971, Syracuse Uni- 
versity 

Rosemary F. Bachvarova, Assistant Professor of 
Genetics. B.A. 1961, Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
1966, Rockefeller University 

Thomas Baker, Research Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology. A.B. 1968, Hunter College; 
M.S. 1971, Cornell University 

Ivan Balazs, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
and Genetics & Molecular Biology. Ph.D. 1972, 
Albert Einstein College of Medicine 

M. Earl Balis, Professor of Biochemistry. B.A. 
1943, Temple University; Ph.D. 1949, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania 

F. Carter Bancroft, Associate Professor of 
Genetics & Molecular Biology & Cell Biology. 
B.S. 1959, Antioch College; M.A. 1961, Johns 
Hopkins University; Ph.D. 1966, University of 
California at Berkeley 

Carl G. Becker, Professor of Pathology. B.S. 
1957, Yale University; M.D. 1961, Cornell 
University 



Register 39 



J. Michael Bedford, Professor of Anatomy. B.A. 
1955, M.A. Vet. M.B. 1958, Cambridge Univer- 
sity (England); Ph.D. 1965, University of 
London (England) 

Dorothea Bennett, Professor of Genetics & 
Molecular Biology. A.B. 1951, Barnard Col- 
lege; Ph.D. 1956, Columbia University 

Yehuda Ben-Shaul, Visiting Professor of 
Genetics & Molecular Biology, M.Sc. 1958, 
Ph.D. 1962, Hebrew University (Israel) 

Barry A. Berkowitz, Adjunct Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology. B.S. 1964, Northeastern 
University; Ph.D. 1968, University of California 

Peter Besmer, Assistant Professor of Genetics 
and Molecular Biology, M.S. 1964, Ph.D. 1969 
Eigenossische Technische Hochschule 
(Switzerland) 

June L. Biedler, Professor of Genetics & Molecu- 
lar Biology and Cell Biology. A.B. 1947, Vassar 
College; Ph.D. 1959, Cornell University 

Rodney E. Bigler, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
physics. B.S. 1966, Portland State University; 
Ph.D. 1971, University of Texas 

Ira B. Black, Associate Professor of Neurology. 

A. B. 1961, Columbia College; M.D. 1965, 
Harvard University 

John P. Blass, Professor of Neurology and Medi- 
cine, A.B. 1958, Harvard University, Ph.D. 1960, 
University of London (England), M.D. 1965, 
Columbia University 

Richard S. Bockman, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1962, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity; M.D. 1967, Yale University; Ph.D. 1971, 
Rockefeller University 

Ellen Borenfreund, /Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.S. 1946, Hunter College; Ph.D. 
1957, New York University 

Adele L. Boskey, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1964, Bar,,ard College; Ph.D. 
1970, Boston University 

Edward A. Boyse, Professor of Immunology. 
M.B. B.S. 1952, M.D. 1957, University of 
London (England) 

David W. Braun, Jr., Assistant Professor of Bio- 
statistics. B.A. 1972, M.S. 1975, Ph.D. 1976, 
State University of New York at Buffalo 

Esther M. Breslow, Professor of Biochemistry. 

B. S. 1953, Cornell University; M.S. 1955, Ph.D. 
1959, New York University 

William A. Briscoe, Professor of Medicine. B.A. 
1939, M.A. 1941, B.M.B.Ch. 1942, D.M. 1951, 
Oxford University (England) 

Dana C. Brooks, Professor of Anatomy. B.E.E. 
1949, M.D. 1957, Cornell University 

William Ted Brown, Assistant Professor of Medi- 
cine. B.A. 1967, M.A. 1969, Ph.D. 1973, Johns 
Hopkins University; M.D. 1974, Harvard 
University 

Hal E. Broxmeyer, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1966, Brooklyn College; M.S. 
1969, Long Island University; Ph.D. 1973, New 
York University 

Peter Bullough, Associate Professor of Pathol- 
ogy. M.D. 1956, Liverpool University (England) 

John J. Burns, Adjunct Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy. B.S. 1942, Queens College; M.A. 1948. 
Ph.D. 1950, Columbia University 



Liebe F. Cavalieri, Professor of Biochemistry. 
B.S. 1943, Ph.D. 1945, University of Pennsyl- 
vania 

R. S. K. Chaganti, Assistant Professor of 

Genetics & Molecular Biology. B.S. 1954, M.S. 
1955, Andhra University (India); Ph.D. 1964. 
Harvard University 

Walter W. Y. Chan, Professor of Pharmacology. 
B.A. 1956, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. 
1961, Columbia University 

Paul L. Chello, Assistant Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy & Experimental Therapeutics. B.A. 1964, 
Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. 1970, Uni- 
versity of Vermont 

Jen-Wei Chiao, Assistant Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.S. 1966, Southwestern University; M.S. 
1968, Ph.D. 1971, University of Illinois Medical 
Center 

Yong S. Choi, Professor of Immunology, M.D. 
1961, Seoul National University (Korea); M.S.. 
Ph.D. 1965, University of Minnesota 

Ting-Chao Chou, Associate Professor of Pharma- 
cology & Experimental Therapeutics. B.S. 
1961, Kaohsiung Medical College (Taiwan); 
M.S. 1965, National Taiwan University; Ph.D. 
1970, Yale University 

Ronald G. Coffey, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S. 1958, Colorado State Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. 1963, Oregon State University 

Thomas J. Colatsky, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology. B.S. 1972, Georgetown University; 
Ph.D. 1977, State University of New York at 
Buffalo 

Arthur J. L. Cooper, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry (Neurology). B.Sc. 1967, M.Sc. 1969, 
University of London (England); Ph.D. 1974, 
Cornell University 

James S. Cornell, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.S. 1969, Michigan State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. 1973, University of California at 
Los Angeles 

Charlotte Cunningham-Rundles, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Immunology and Biochemistry. B.S. 
1965, Duke University; M.D. 1969, Columbia 
College of Physicians and Surgeons; Ph.D. 
1974, New York University 

P. William Curreri, Professor of Surgery. A.B. 
1958, Swarthmore College; M.D. 1962, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania 

B. Shannon Danes, Associate Professor of Med- 
icine. B.A. 1948, Mount Holyoke College; M.A. 
1949, University of Texas; Ph.D. 1952. State 
University of Iowa; M.D. 1962, Columbia 
University 

Farrington Daniels. Jr., Professor of Medicine 
and Public Health. B.A. 1940, University of 
Wisconsin; M.D. 1943, Harvard University 

Gretchen Darlington. Assistant Professor of 
Genetics. B.A. 1964, University of Colorado; 
M.A. 1966, Ph.D. 1970, University of Michigan 

Zbigniew Darzynkiewicz, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry and Cell Biology. M.D. 1960, 
Academy of Medicine. Warsaw (Poland); Ph.D. 
1965, Academy of Medicine and Polish Acad- 
emy of Sciences (Poland) 



40 Register 



Noorbibi K. Day, Professor of Immunology. B.A. 

1956, M.A. 1960, Trinity College (Ireland); 
Ph.D. 1967, McGill University (Canada) 

Eleanor E. Deschner, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.A. 1949, Notre Dame of Staten 
Island; M.S. 1951, Ph.D. 1954, Fordham 
University 

Etienne P. de Harven, Professor of Cell Biology. 
M.D. 1953, Universite Libre de Bruxelles 
(Belgium) 

Maria A. B. de Sousa, Associate Professor of 
Immunology. M.D. 1963, Lisbon Medical Fac- 
ulty (Portugal); Ph.D. 1971, University of 
Glasgow (Scotland); M.R.C. 1973, Royal 
College of Pathologists (England) 

Robert W. Dickerman, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology. B.S. 1951, Cornel! University; 
M.A. 1953, University of Arizona; Ph.D. 1961, 
University of Minnesota 

David B. Donner, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1966, Queens College; Ph.D. 
1972, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Gerald B. Dooher, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology. B.A. 1965, Rutgers University; M.A. 

1967, Ph.D. 1971, Columbia University 

John W. Dougherty, Clinical Associate Professor 
of Medicine. B.S. 1941, M.D. 1943, University 
of Minnesota 

Dennis E. Drayer, Research Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology. B.S. 1966, Brooklyn Col- 
lege; Ph.D. 1971, University of Delaware 

Thomas E. Duffy, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry in Neurology; Assistant Professor 
of Biochemistry (Neurology). B.S. 1962, Loy- 
ola University; Ph.D. 1967, University of 
Maryland 

Bo Dupont, Professor of Immunology and Genet- 
ics & Molecular Biology. M.D. 1966, University 
of Arhus (Denmark) 

Magdalena G. Eisinger, Assistant Professor of 
Cell Biology. D.V.M. 1962, Agricultural Univer- 
sity Kosice (Czechoslovakia) 

John T. Ellis, Professor of Pathology. B.A. 1942, 
University of Texas; M.D. 1945, Northwestern 
University 

Robert L. Evans, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. M.D. 1972, University of Washing- 
ton 

Donald P. Evenson, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology. B.A. 1964, Augustana College; Ph.D. 

1968, University of Colorado 

Ronald B. Faanes, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
of Immunology and Pharmacology & Experi- 
mental Therapeutics. B.A. 1964, M.S. 1968, 
Ph.D. 1970, University of Minnesota 

Gordon F. Fairclough, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. B.A. 1960, Ph.D. 1966, Yale 
University 

Colin Fell, Associate Professor of Physiology. 
B.A. 1951, Antioch College; M.S. 1953, Ph.D. 

1957, Wayne State University 

Gabriel Fernandes, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1973, M.S. 1975, University of 



Minnesota; Ph.D. 1979, University of Bombay 
(India) 

Martin Fleisher, Assistant Professor of Biochem- 
istry. B.A. 1958, Harpur College; Ph.D. 1966, 
New York University 

Erwin Fleissner, Professor of Genetics & Molec- 
ular Biology. B.A. 1957, Yale University; Ph.D. 

1963, Columbia University 

Jorgen E. Fogh, Associate Professor of Cell 
Biology. M.D. 1949, University of Copenhagen 
(Denmark) 

Jack J. Fox, Professor of Biochemistry and 
Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics. 
A.B. 1939, Ph.D. 1950, University of Colorado 

Jerrold Fried, Associate Professor of Biophys- 
ics. B.S. 1958, California Institute of Technol- 
ogy; Ph.D. 1964, Stanford University 

Eileen A. Friedman, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 
A.B. 1967, New York University; Ph.D. 1972, 
Johns Hopkins University 

Gustavo Frindt, Assistant Professor of Physiol- 
ogy. M.D. 1963, Catholic University of Chile 

Daniel Gardner, Associate Professor of Physiol- 
ogy. A.B. 1966, Columbia College; Ph.D. 1971, 
New York University 

Jerald D. Gass, Associate Professor of Biochem- 
istry. B.S. 1957, University of Oklahoma; A.M. 
1962, Harvard University; Ph.D. 1969,. Cornell 
University 

Michael S. Gazzaniga, Professor of Neuropsy- 
chology. A.B. 1961, Dartmouth College; Ph.D. 

1964, California Institute of Technology 
Alan S. Gelbard, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
physics. B.S. 1955, Brooklyn College; M.S. 
1956, University of Massachusetts; Ph.D. 1959, 
University of Wisconsin 

Nancy L. Geller, Assistant Professor of Biosta- 
tistics. B.S. 1965, City University of New York; 
M.A. 1967, Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D. 

1972, Case Western Reserve University 
James L. German III, Clinical Professor of 

Anatomy. B.S. 1945, Louisiana Polytechnic 
Institute; M.D. 1949, Southwestern Medical 
College 

James G. Gibbs, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Psychiatry. B.S. 1960, Trinity College; M.D. 
1964, Medical College of South Carolina 

Gary E. Gibson, Assistant Professor of Neurol- 
ogy. B.S. 1968, University of Wyoming; Ph.D. 

1973, Cornell University 

Helena Gilder, Associate Professor of Biochem- 
istry in Surgery; Assistant Professor of 
Biochemistry. A.B. 1935, Vassar College; M.D. 
1940, Cornell University 

Alfredo Giner-Sorollo, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry and Pharmacology & Experi- 
mental Therapeutics. M.S. 1944, University of 
Valencia (Spain); Ph.D. 1958, Cornell 
University 

Fakhry Girgis, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
M.B.B.Ch. 1949, Cairo University (Egypt); 
Ph.D. 1957, Queen's University (Northern 
Ireland) 



Register 41 



Lloyd H. Graf, Jr., Research Assistant Professor 
of Genetics. B.S. 1967, University of Delaware; 
Ph.D. 1972, Duke University 

Jack Goldstein, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1952, Brooklyn College; 
M.N.S. 1957, Ph.D. 1959, Cornell University 

Peter J. Gomatos, Professor of Genetics & 
Molecular Biology. S.B. 1950, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; M.D. 1954, Johns 
Hopkins University; Ph.D. 1963, Rockefeller 
University. 

Robert A. Good, Professor of Immunology. B.A. 

1944, M.B. 1946, M.D. 1947, University of 
Minnesota 

Edmond Alexandre Goidl, Assistant Professor of 
Immunology. M.S. 1971, The American Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. 1975, Cornell University 

Bernice Grafstein, Professor of Physiology. B.A. 
1951, University of Toronto (Canada); Ph.D. 
1954, McGill University (Canada) 

Saul Green, Associate Professor of Biochem- 
istry. B.S. 1948, City College of New York; 
Ph.D. 1952, State University of Iowa 

Roger L. Greif, Professor of Physiology and 
Biophysics. B.S. 1937, Haverford College; 
M.D. 1941, Johns Hopkins University 

Owen W. Griffith, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1968, University of California 
at Berkeley; Ph.D. 1976, Rockefeller University 

Sudhir Gupta, Associate Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.S. 1961, Agra University (India); 
M.B.B.S., Doctorate in Internal Medicine 1970, 
King George's Medical College, Lucknow 
University (India) 

John W. Hadden, Associate Professor of Im- 
munology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.A. 1961, Yale University; M.D. 
1965, Columbia University 

Wilbur D. Hagamen, Professor of Anatomy. B.S. 

1945, Baldwin-Wallace College; M.D. 1951, 
Cornell University 

Katherine A. Halmi, Associate Professor of 
Psychiatry. B.A. 1961, University of Iowa; M.D. 

1965, University of Iowa 

Martin D. Hamburg, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
of Anatomy. B.A. 1965, New York University; 
Ph.D. 1969, University of Michigan 

Ulrich G. Hammerling, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. B.A. 1959, Freie Universitat 
Berlin; M.A. 1961, Albert Ludwigs Universitat; 
Ph.D. 1965, Max Planck Institut fur Immuno- 
biologie (Germany) 

Mary G. Hamilton, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 
B.A. 1947, University of Buffalo; Ph.D. 1961, 
Cornell University 

William D. Hardy, Jr., Assistant Professor of 
Genetics & Molecular Biology. A. A. 1960, B.S. 
1962, George Washington University; V.M.D. 

1966, University of Pennsylvania 

Rudy H. Haschemeyer, Professor of Biochem- 
istry. B.A. 1952, Carthage College; Ph.D. 1957, 
University of Illinois 



Erich Heinz, Professor of Physiology and Bio- 
physics. M.D. 1939, University of Munster and 
Kiel (Germany) 

Paul J. Higgins, Assistant Professor of Biochem- 
istry and Genetics & Molecular Biology. B.S. 
1969, lona College; M.S. 1973, Long Island 
University; Ph.D. 1976, New York University 

Yashar Hirshaut, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.A. 1959, Yeshiva University; M.D. 

1963, Albert Einstein College of Medicine 
Michael Hoffman, Associate Professor of Im- 
munology. M.D. 1966, Universitat Tubingen 
(Germany) 

Bernard L. Horecker, Adjunct Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.S. 1936, Ph.D. 1939, University of 
Chicago 

Raymond W. Houde, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology. A. B. 1940, M.D. 1943, New 
York University 

Dorris J. Hutchison, Professor of Pharmacology 
& Experimental Therapeutics. B.S. 1940, West- 
ern Kentucky State College; M.S. 1943, 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D. 1949, Rutgers 
University 

Genevieve Incefy, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.Sc. 1959, M.Sc. 1960, Ph.D. 

1964, Ohio State University 

Charles E. Inturrisi, Professor of Pharmacology 
B.S. 1962, University of Connecticut; M.S. 

1965, Ph.D. 1967, Tulane University 
Norman B. Javitt, Professor of Medicine. A.B. 

1947, Syracuse University; Ph.D. 1951, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; M.D. 1954, Duke 
University 

Tong Hyub Joh, Associate Professor of Neuro- 
biology in Neurology. B.S. 1953, Seoul 
National University (Korea); M.S. 1965, Uni- 
versity of Missouri; Ph.D. 1971 , New York 
University 

Edward M. Johnson, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
of Genetics. B.A. 1967, Pomona College; Ph.D. 
1971, Yale University 

Brian R. Jones, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology. B.Sc. 1970, University of London 
(England); M.B. B.S. 1973, St. Mary's Hospital 
School of the University of London (England) 

Thomas Clifford Jones, Professor of Medicine. 
B.A. 1958, Allegheny College; M.D. 1962, Case 
Western Reserve University 

Robert F. Kaiko, Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology. B.S. 1970, University of Con- 
necticut; Ph.D. 1974, Cornell University 

Barry B. Kaplan, Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
B.A. 1968, M.A. 1969, Hofstra University; Ph.D. 
1974, Cornell University 

Aaron Kellner, Clinical Professor of Pathology. 
B.A. 1934, Yeshiva College; M.S. 1936, Colum- 
bia University; M.D. 1939, University of 
Chicago 

Alan J. Kenyon, Professor of Immunology. A.B. 
1954, D.V.M. 1957, Ph.D. 1961, University of 
Minnesota 



42 Register 



John A. Kessler, Assistant Professor of Neurol- 
ogy. A.B. 1967, Princeton University; M.D. 
1971, Cornel! University 

Yoon B. Kim, Professor of Immunology. M.D. 
1958, School of Medicine, Seoul National 
University (Korea); Ph.D. 1965, University of 
Minnesota 

Jae Ho Kim, Associate Professor of Biophysics. 
M.D. 1959, Kyungpook National School of 
Medicine (Korea); Ph.D. 1963, State University 
of Iowa 

Paul W. Kincade, Associate Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1966, M.S. 1968, Mississippi 
State University; Ph.D. 1971, University of 
Alabama 

Gloria C. Koo, Assistant Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.A. 1965, Goshen College; Ph.D. 1970, 
Temple University 

Levy Kopelovich, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S. 1958, Hebrew University 
(Israel); Ph.D. 1962, University of California 

Leonhard Korngold, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology in Surgery (Orthopedics). B.A. 
1947, Brooklyn College; M.Sc. 1948, Ph.D. 
1950, Ohio State University 

lone A. Kourides, Associate Professor of Genet- 
ics & Molecular Biology. B.A. 1963, Wellesley 
College; M.D. 1967, Harvard University 

Willi Kreis, Associate Professor of Biochemistry 
and Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeu- 
tics. M.D. 1954. University of Zurich; Ph.D. 
1957. University of Basel (Switzerland) 

Robert M. Krug, Professor of Genetics & Molec- 
ular Biology. B.A. 1961. Harvard University; 
Ph.D. 1966, Rockefeller University 

Raju S. Kucherlapati, Adjunct Assistant Profes- 
sor. B.S. 1960, P.R. College (India); M.S. 1962. 
Andhra University (India); Ph.D. 1972, Univer- 
sity of Illinois 

Henn Kutt, Associate Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy. M.D. 1950, University of Frankfurt 
(Germany) 

John S. Laughlin, Professor of Biophysics. A.B. 
1940, Willamette University; Ph.D. 1947, Uni- 
versity of Illinois 

Chin Ok Lee, Assistant Professor of Physiology. 
M.S. 1967, Seoul National University (Korea); 
Ph.D. 1973. Indiana School of Medicine 

Martin L. Lesser, Assistant Professor of Biosta- 
tistics. B.A. 1974. M.S. 1976, Ph.D. 1978. 
Rutgers University 

Daniel E. Levy, Associate Professor of Neurol- 
ogy. A.B. 1963, M.D. 1968, Harvard University 

Roberto Levi, Professor of Pharmacology. M.D. 
1960. University of Florence (Italy) 

Kenneth W. Lieberman. Assistant Professor of 
Biochemistry in Psychiatry. B.A. 1960. Brook- 
lyn College; M.S. 1963. Texas Technological 
College; Ph.D. 1966. University of Kentucky 

Martin Lipkin, Professor of Medicine. A.B. 1946. 
M.D. 1950, New York University 

Gary W. Litman, Associate Professor of Im- 



munology. B.A. 1967, Ph.D. 1972, University 
of Minnesota 

Stephen D. Litwin, Associate Professor of Med- 
icine. B.A. 1955, Brooklyn College; M.D. 1959, 
New York University 

Kenneth O. Lloyd, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. Ph.D. 1960, University College of 
North Wales (England) 

Carlos Lopez, Associate Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.A. 1965, M.S. 1966, Ph.D. 1970, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota 

Thomas M. Maack, Professor of Physiology. M.D. 
1962, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) 

Irvine G. McQuarrie, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology; Assistant Professor of Surgery 
(Neurosurgery). B.S. 1961, University of Utah; 
M.D. 1965, Ph.D. 1977, Cornell University 

Bipin M. Mehta, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology & Experimental Therapeutics. B.Sc. 

1955, M.Sc. 1957, Ph.D. 1963, Bombay Uni- 
versity (India) 

Thomas H. Meikle, Jr., Associate Professor of 
Anatomy. A.B. 1951, M.D. 1954, Cornell 
University 

Alton Meister, Israel Rogosin Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.S. 1942, Harvard University; M.D. 
1945, Cornell University 

Myron R. Melamed, Professor of Cell Biology. 
B.S. 1947, Western Reserve University; M.D. 
1950, University of Cincinnati 

Peter W. Melera, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 
A.A.S. 1963. State University of New York 
at Cobleskill; B.S.A. 1965, Ph.D. 1969, Univer- 
sity of Georgia 

Robert C. Mellors, Professor of Pathology. A.B. 
1937, M.A. 1938, Ph.D. 1940, Western Reserve 
University; M.D. 1944. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity 

Steven R. Meshnik, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine. B.A. 1972, Columbia University; 
Ph.D. 1978, Rockefeller University 

Valerie Mike, Professor of Biostatistics. B.A. 

1956, Manhattanville College; M.S. 1959. Ph.D. 
1967, New York University 

C. Richard Minick, Professor of Pathology. B.S. 

1957, University of Wyoming; M.D. 1960, 
Cornell University 

Mukund J. Modak. Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry and Genetics & Molecular Biol- 
ogy. B.Sc. 1963, University of Poona (India): 
M.Sc. 1965, University of Bombay (India); 
Ph.D. 1969, Haffkine Institute, University of 
Bombay (India) 

Radhe Mohan, Visiting Assistant Professor of 
Biophysics. B.S. 1959. M.S. 1963, Punjabi 
University (India); Ph.D. 1969, Duke University 

Anne C. Moore, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.A. 1970. Carleton College; Ph.D. 
1976, University of California, Berkeley 

Malcolm A. S. Moore. Professor of Cell Biology. 
M B. 1963, B.A. 1964, D. Phil. 1967, M.A. 1970, 
Oxford University (England) 



Register 43 



George E. Murphy, Professor of Pathology. A.B. 
1939, University of Kansas; M.D. 1943, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 

William G. Myers, Visiting Professor of Bio- 
physics. A.B. 1933, M.Sc. 1937, Ph.D. 1939, 
M.D. 1941, Ohio State University 

Ralph L. Nachman, Professor of Medicine. A.B. 
1953, M.D. 1956, Vanderbilt University 

Jerome S. Nisselbaum, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. B.A. 1949, University of Con- 
necticut; Ph.D. 1953, Tufts University 

Abraham Novogrodsky, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. M.D. 1960, Hebrew University 
Medical School, Jerusalem; Ph.D. 1974, Weiz- 
mann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel) 

Paul V. O'Donnell, Assistant Professor of 
Genetics & Molecular Biology. B.S. 1968, 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D. 1973, 
Cornell University 

Herbert F. Oettgen, Associate Professor of Im- 
munology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. M.D. 1951, University of 
Cologne (Germany) 

Michiko Okamoto, Professor of Pharmacology. 
B.S. 1954, Tokyo College of Pharmacy 
(Japan); M.S. 1957, Purdue University; Ph.D. 
1964, Cornell University 

Lloyd J. Old, Professor of Immunology. B.A. 
1955, M.D. 1958, University of California 

William M. O'Leary, Professor of Microbiology. 
B.S. 1952, M.S. 1953, Ph.D. 1957, University 
of Pittsburgh 

Geoffrey J. O'Neill, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.Sc. 1970, Ph.D. 1973, University 
of Glasgow (Scotland) 

Richard J. O'Reilly, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. A.B. 1964, Colhge of the Holy 
Cross; M.D. 1968, University of Rochester 

Brian A. Otter, Assistant Professor of Biochem- 
istry and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.Sc. 1962, Ph.D. 1965, Univer- 
sity of Bristol (England) 

Rajendra N. Pahwa, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. M.B.B.S. 1966, M.D. 1969, Indore 
Medical College (India) 

Savita G. Pahwa, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. M.B.B.S. 1970, M.D. 1976, Lady 
Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India) 

Lawrence G. Palmer, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology. B.A. 1970, Swarthmore College; 
Ph.D. 1976, University of Pennsylvania 

James C. Parham, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S 1959, Bates College; Ph.D. 
1963, Duke University 

Gavril W. Pasternak, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacology. B.A. 1969, M.D. 1973, Ph.D. 
1974, Johns Hopkins University 

Robert F. Peterson, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S. 1959, Elizabethtown Col- 
lege; Ph.D. 1970, University of Kansas 

Carol K. Petito, Assistant Professor of Pathol- 



ogy. BS. 1963, Jackson College; M.D. 1967, 
Columbia University 

Frederick S. Philips, Professor of Pharmacology 
& Experimental Therapeutics. B.A. 1936, 
Columbia University; Ph.D. 1940, University 
of Rochester 

Virginia Picket, Assistant Professor of Neurol- 
ogy. B.S. 1965, M.S. 1967, University of 
Tennessee; Ph.D. 1970, Vanderbilt University 

Thomas G. Pickering, Associate Professor of 
Medicine. B.A. 1962, M.A. 1968, Cambridge 
University (England); Ph.D. 1970, Oxford Uni- 
versity (England) 

Abraham Pinter, Assistant Professor of Genetics 
& Molecular Biology. B.Sc. 1969, Brooklyn 
College; Ph.D. 1973, Columbia University 

Chris D. Platsoukas, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1973, University of Patras 
(Greece); Ph.D. 1978, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

Fred Plum, Anne Parrish Titzell Professor of 
Neurology. B.A. 1944, Dartmouth College; 
M.D. 1947, Cornell University 

Marilyn S. Pollack, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. A.B. 1961, M.A. 1963, University of 
California at Berkeley; Ph.D. 1968, Rutgers 
University 

Aaron S. Posner, Professor of Biochemistry. B.S. 
1941, Rutgers University; M.S. 1949, Poly- 
technic Institute of Brooklyn; Ph.D. 1954, 
University of Liege (Belgium) 

Sue G. Powers, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.S. 1969, University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D. 1974, University of California at 
Berkeley 

Wolf Prensky, Assistant Professor of Genetics & 
Molecular Biology. B.S. 1953, Cornell Univer- 
sity; M.S. 1957, Ph.D. 1961, University of 
Illinois 

Alfred M. Prince, Clinical Associate Professor of 
Pathology. A.B. 1949, Yale University; M.A. 
1951, Columbia University; M.D. 1955, Western 
Reserve University 

Enrique M. Rabellino, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine. B.S. 1959, Institute J. M. Paz 
(Argentina); M.D. 1965, University of Cordoba 
(Argentina) 

Julian R. Rachele, Professor of Biochemistry. 
B.A. 1934, M.S. 1935, Ph.D. 1939, New York 
University 

Peter Ralph, Associate Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.A. 1958, Yale University; M.A. 1960, 
University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D. 
1968, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Joan K. Rankin, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology. B.S. 1960, Westminister College; M.S. 
1968, New York University; M.A. 1970, Hofstra 
University; Ph.D. 1979, Cornell University 

Marcus M. Reidenberg, Professor of Pharma- 
cology. B.S. 1954, Cornell University; M.D. 
1958, Temple University 

Donald J. Reis, Professor of Neurology. A.B. 
1953, M.D. 1956, Cornell University 



44 Register 



Arleen B. Rifkind, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology; Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
B.A. 1960, Bryn Mawr College; M.D. 1964, New 
York University 

Robert Riggio, Professor of Biochemistry. B.A. 

1954, Dartmouth College; M.D. 1958, New 
York University 

Walter F. Riker, Jr., Professor of Pharmacology. 
B.S. 1939, Columbia University; M.D. 1943, 
Cornell University 

Joseph Roberts, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.Sc, 1959, University of Toron- 
to (Canada); M.S. 1962, University of 
Wisconsin; Ph.D. 1964, McGill University 
(Canada) 

Richard B. Roberts, Professor of Medicine. B.A. 

1955, Dartmouth College; M.D. 1959, Temple 
University 

Toby C. Rodman, Associate Professor of Anat- 
omy. B.S. 1937, Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy and Science; M.S. 1961, Ph.D. 1963, 
New York University 

Barbara H. Rosenberg, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. B.S. 1960, Ph.D. 1962, Cornell 
University 

Albert L. Rubin, Professor of Biochemistry in 
Surgery. M.D. 1950, Cornell University 

Pablo Rubenstein, Adjunct Associate Professor 
of Genetics. Ph.D. 1964, Universidad de Chile 

Gerald A. Russ, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
physics and Pharmacology & Experimental 
Therapeutics. B.S. 1964, University of Mary- 
land; Ph.D. 1974, Georgetown University 

Bijan Safai, Assistant Professor of Immunology. 
M.D. 1965, University of Teheran Medical 
School (Iran) 

Charles A. Santos-Buch, Professor of Pathology. 
A.B. 1953, Harvard University; M.D. 1957, 
Cornell University 

Nurul H. Sarkar, Associate Professor of Genetics 
& Molecular Biology. B.S. 1957, M.S. 1960. 
Ph.D. 1966, University of Calcutta (India) 

Br i j B. Saxena, Professor of Endocrinology in 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. Ph.D. 1954, Uni- 
versity of Lucknow (India); D.Sc. 1957, 
University of Muenster (Germany); Ph.D. 1961, 
University of Wisconsin 

Margrit Scheid, Associate Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. M.D. 1970, Physiologisches Institut der 
Freien Universitat Berlin (Germany) 

William F. Scherer, Professor of Microbiology. 
M.D. 1947, University of Rochester 

Allan S. Schneider, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. B.Ch.E. 1961, Rensselaer Polytech- 
nic Institute; M.S. 1963. Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D. 1968, University of California 
at Berkeley 

William N. Schoenfeld, Adjunct Professor of 
Psychology in Psychiatry. B.S. 1937, City 
College of New York; A.M. 1939, Ph.D. 1942, 
Columbia University 

Edward T. Schubert, Assistant Professor of 



Biochemistry in Pediatrics. B.S. 1949, M.S. 
1952, Ph.D. 1959, Fordham University 

Morton K. Schwartz, Professor of Biochemistry. 
B.A. 1948, Lehigh University; Ph.D. 1952, 
Boston University 

Jeri A. Sechzer, Associate Professor of Psy- 
chology in Psychiatry. B.S. 1956, New York 
University; M.A. 1961, Ph.D. 1962, University 
of Pennsylvania 

Ganes C. Sen. Assistant Professor of Biochem- 
istry and Genetics & Molecular Biology. B.S. 

1965, M.S. 1967, Calcutta University (India); 
Ph.D. 1974, McMaster University (Canada) 

Laurence B. Senterfit, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology. B.S. 1949, M.S. 1950, University 
of Florida; Sc.D. 1955, Johns Hopkins 
University 

Thomas M. Setcavage, Assistant Professor of 
Immunology. B.S. 1968, Gannon College; 
Ph.D. 1974, University of Minnesota 

Fung-Win Shen, Assistant Professor of Immunol- 
ogy. B.S. 1968, Fu-Jen Catholic University 
(Taiwan); M.S. 1971, Ph.D. 1973, University of 
New Mexico 

Merry M. Sherman, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 
B.A. 1961, Wellesley College; M.A. 1963, Ph.D. 

1966, University of California at Berkeley 
Selma Silagi, Professor of Genetics in Obstet- 
rics and Gynecology. A.B. 1936, Hunter 
College; Ph.D. 1961, Columbia University 

Allen E. Silverstone, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology, Genetics & Molecular Biology and 
Pharmacology & Exerimental Therapeutics. 
B.A. 1964, Reed College; Ph.D. 1970, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 

Marcello Siniscalco, Professor of Genetics & 
Molecular Biology. M.D. 1948, University of 
Naples (Italy) 

Julio L. Sirlin, Professor of Anatomy. D.Sc. 1953, 
University of Buenos Aires (Argentina) 

Francis M. Sirotnak, Professor of Pharmacology 
& Experimental Therapeutics. B.S. 1950, Uni- 
versity of Scranton; Ph.D. 1954, University of 
Maryland 

Gregory W. Siskind, Professor of Medicine. B.A. 

1955, Cornell University; M.D. 1959, New York 
University 

Vladimir P. Skipski, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. M.S. 1938, Kiev University; As- 
pirantura 1941, Institute of Experimental 
Biology and Pathology (Kiev, U.S.S.R.); Ph.D. 

1956, University of Southern California 
Gerard P. Smith, Professor of Psychiatry (Be- 
havioral Science). B.S. 1956, St. Joseph's 
College; M.D. 1960, University of Pennsylvania 

Elizabeth M. Smithwick, Associate Professor of 

Immunology. B.S. 1948, M.D. 1955, University 

of Wisconsin 
Harry W. Snyder, Jr., Assistant Professor of Cell 

Biology and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 

B.A. 1969, Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. 

1974, Georgetown University 



Register 45 



Richard L. Softer, Professor of Biochemistry and 
Medicine. B.A. 1954, Amherst College; M.D. 
1958, Harvard University 

David Soifer, Adjunct Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy. B.S. 1961, Columbia University; 
Ph.D. 1969, Cornell University 

Martin Sonenberg, Professor of Biochemistry. 
B.S. 1941, University of Pennsylvania; M.D. 
1944, Ph.D. 1952, New York University 

Martha Spiegelman, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology. B.A. 1958, Albertus Magnus College; 
M.A. 1965, Ph.D. 1970, Columbia University 

Edward Stavnezer, Assistant Professor of Genet- 
ics & Molecular Biology. B.A. 1965, M.S. 1967. 
University of Connecticut; Ph.D. 1971, Johns 
Hopkins University 

Janet Stavnezer, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology and Genetics & Molecular Biology. 
B.A. 1966, Swarthmore College; Ph.D. 1971, 
Johns Hopkins University 

Kurt H. Stenzel, Professor of Biochemistry in 
Surgery. B.S. 1954, New York University; M.D. 
1958, Cornell University 

Stephen S. Sternberg, Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy & Experimental Therapeutics and Asso- 
ciate Professor of Cell Biology. B.A. 1941, 
Colby College; M.D. 1944, New York Uni- 
versity 

Gerhard Stohrer, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. Ph.D. 1965, Freie Universitat Berlin 
(Germany) 

Peter E. Stokes, Associate Professor of Med- 
icine and Psychiatry. B.S. 1948, Trinity 
College; M.D. 1952, Cornell University 

Osias Stutman Professor of Immunology. B.A. 
1950, Colegio Nacional Sarmiento (Argen- 
tina); M.D. 1957, Buenos Aires University 
Medical School (Argentina) 

Nurul H. Sarkar, Associate Professor of Biology. 
B.S. 1957, M.S. 1960, Ph.D. 1966, University 
of Calcutta (India) 

Fung-Win Shen, Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.S. 1968, Fu-Jen Catholic University (Tai- 
wan); M.S. 1971, Ph.D. 1973, University of 
New Mexico 

Karen A. Sullivan, Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology. B.S. 1966, North Adams State 
College; Ph.D. 1973, Duke University 

Myron Susin, Clinical Associate Professor of 
Pathology. B.A. 1956, Augustana College; M.D. 
1960, University of Illinois 

Dieter H. Sussdorf. Associate Professor of Mi- 
crobiology. B.A. 1952, University of Kansas 
City; Ph.D. 1956, University of Chicago 

Roy C Swan, Joseph C. Hinsey Professor of 
Anatomy. A.B. 1941, M.D. 1947, Cornell 
University 

Hazel H. Szeto, Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology. B.S. 1972, Indiana University; Ph.D.. 
M.D. 1977, Cornell University 

Suresh S. Tate, Associate Professor of Biochem- 



istry. B.Sc. 1958, M.Sc. 1960, University of 
Baroda (India); Ph.D. 1963, University of Lon- 
don (England) 

Morris M. Teller, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macology & Experimental Therapeutics. B.S. 
1940, Brooklyn College; Ph.D. 1949, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota 

Howard Thaler, Assistant Professor of Biosta- 
tistics. B.A. 1967, University of California at 
Los Angeles; Ph.D. 1974, State University of 
New York at Buffalo 

Lewis Thomas, Professor of Cell Biology. B.S. 
1933, Princeton University; M.D. 1937, Har- 
vard University; M.A. 1969, Yale University 

Paul P. Trotta, Assistant Professor of Biochem- 
istry. A.B. 1964, Columbia University; Ph.D. 
1968, State University of New York Downstate 
Medical Center 

Jwu-Sheng Tung, Assistant Professor of Genet- 
ics & Molecular Biology. B.A. 1959, National 
Taiwan University (Taiwan); M.S. 1966, Ph.D. 
1971, University of California at Berkeley 

Stephen S. Wachtel, Associate Professor of 
Immunology and Cell Biology. A.B. 1959, 
Kenyon College; Ph.D. 1971, University of 
Pennsylvania 

Kyoichi A. Watanabe, Professor of Pharmacol- 
ogy and Experimental Therapeutics. Ph.D. 
1963, Hokkaido University (Japan) 

John Weber, Associate Professor of Anatomy. 
B.A. 1961, D.D.S. 1965, Columbia University 

Marc E. Weksler, Associate Professor of Med- 
icine. B.A. 1958, Swarthmore College; M.D. 
1962, Columbia University 

Daniel Wellner, Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry. A.B. 1956, Harvard University; 
Ph.D. 1961, Tufts University 

Michael E. Wiebe, Assistant Professor of Micro- 
biology. B.A. 1965, Sterling College; Ph.D. 
1971, University of Kansas 

Neil T. Williams, Assistant Professor of Cell 
Biology. B.Sc. 1969, Ph.D. 1973, University of 
Melbourne (Australia) 

Robert J. Winchester, Adjunct Associate Pro- 
fessor of Genetics. B.S. 1958, Manhattan 
College; M.D. 1963, Cornell University 

Erich H. Windhager, Professor of Physiology. 
M.D. 1954, University of Vienna (Austria) 

Jacqueline M. S. Winterkorn, Assistant Professor 
of Anatomy. A.B. 1967, Barnard College; 
Ph.D. 1974, Cornell University 

Steven S. Witkin, Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry and Immunology. B.A. 1965, Hunter 
College; M.S. 1967, University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D. 1970, University of California 

Kenneth R. Woods, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry. B.A. 1948, Arizona State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. 1955, University of Minnesota 

Lily C. Yip, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 
Ph.D. 1965, University of Cincinnati 



46 Register 



Morris S. Zedeck, Associate Professor of Phar- 
macology & Experimental Therapeutics. B.S. 
1961, Brooklyn College of Pharmacy; Ph.D. 
1965, University of Michigan 

Louis Zeitz, Associate Professor of Biophysics. 
A.B. 1948, University of California; Ph.D. 1962 
Stanford University 



Degree Recipients 1980-81 

Doctors of Philosophy 

Russell N. A. Cecil, B.A. 1974, Yale University; 
M.D. 1978, Ph.D. 1980, Cornell University. 
Major: pathology. Washington, D.C. 

Michael P. Davey, B.S. 1976, Manhattan College; 
Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: micro- 
biology. Clark, New Jersey 

Domenick J. Falcone, B.A. 1975, Queens College; 
Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: biolog- 
ical structure and cell biology. Flushing, 
New York 

W. Harry Horner, B.A. 1973, Washington and 
Jefferson College; Ph.D. 1981, Cornell Uni- 
versity. Major: pathology. Allison Park, 
Pennsylvania 

Nam Doll Huh, B.S. 1974, Yonsei University 
(Korea); Ph.D. 1980, Cornell University. Major: 
biology. Seoul, Korea 

James C. Jenson, B.A. 1969, Macalester College; 
Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: biology. 
Mamaroneck, New York 

Jacki Kornbluth, B.S. 1976, Ph.D. 1980, Cornell 
University. Major: genetics. Brooklyn, New 
York 

Janice Kotch Gutowski, B.A. 1976, University of 
New Hampshire; Ph.D. 1981, Cornell Univer- 
sity. Major: pathology. New Canaan, Con- 
necticut 

John A. Lewis, A.B. 1971, Harvard University; 

Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: biology. 

Providence, Rhode Island 
John S. MacGregor, B.A. 1974, University of 

California at San Diego; Ph.D. 1981, Cornell 

University. Major: biochemistry. San Diego, 

California 

Mary A. O'Connell, B.S. 1975, College of Mt. St. 
Vincent; Ph.D. 1980, Cornell University. Major: 
biology. Scarsdale, New York 

Elizabeth A. Peterson, A. A. 1973, Nassau Com- 
munity College; B.A. 1976, Queens College; 
Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: biology. 
Flushing, New York 

Luiu A. Pickering, B.A. 1975, University of 
Rochester; Ph.D. 1980, Cornell University. 
Major: biochemistry. Newington, New Hamp- 
shire 

Nancy R. Schneider, B.A. 1963, Ohio Wesleyan 
University; M.A. 1964, University of Michigan; 
Ph.D. 1981, Cornell University. Major: genet- 
ics. New York, New York 

Bauer E. Sumpio, M.A. 1974, Johns Hopkins 



University; M.D. 1980, PhD. 1981, Cornell Uni- 
versity. Major: physiology. Man, West Virginia 

Master of Science 

Karl P. Dresdner, Jr., B.A. 1976, Lake Forest 
College, M.S. 1981, Cornell University. Major: 
physiology. Glenridge, New Jersey 



Students 1981-82 

Candidates for the Degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Laura M. Aaronson, B.A. 1973, Brandeis Univer- 
sity; M.S. 1977, Northeastern University. 
Major: pharmacology. Boston, Massachusetts 

Alberto M. Acosta, B.A. 1978, Columbia Univer- 
sity. Major: pathology. Havana, Cuba 

Vivian Risa Albert, B.A. 1979, M.S. 1980, Stan- 
ford University. Major: neurobiology and 
behavior. Los Angeles, California 

Althea P. Kintaner Alton, B.S. 1976, University of 
the Philippines. Major: biology. Manila, 
Philippines 

Mary E. Anderson, B.A. 1977, Hollins College. 

Major: biochemistry. San Antonio, Texas 
Angelo N. Arnold, B.S. 1972, State University of 

New York at Stony Brook; M.S. 1978, €. W. 

Post. Major: biochemistry. Brooklyn, New 

York 

David K. Batter, B.S. 1979, University of Con- 
necticut. Major: neurobiology and behavior. 
New Haven, Connecticut 

E. Edward Baetge, B.A. 1978, University of Cali- 
fornia at San Diego. Major: neurobiology and 
behavior. Fort Monmouth, New Jersey 

Ann R. Beaton, B.S. 1976, Cornell University. 
Major: biology. Port Chester, New York 

Linda S. Belkowski, BA. 1979, Rutgers Univer- 
sity. Major: biology. Perth Amboy, New Jersey 

Peter J. Bergold, B.S. 1977, Trinity College. 
Major: biology. Teaneck, New Jersey 

Steven L. Bernstein, B.Sc. 1975, Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy and Science. Major: 
neurobiology and behavior. Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

Richard C. Binari, B.S. 1977, University of Notre 
Dame. Major: biology. Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts 

Seymour G. Blank, B.E.E. 1965, City University 
of New York; M.E.E. 1968, New York Univer- 
sity. Major: physiology. Brooklyn, New York 

Carolyn A. Blanckmeister, B.A. 1975, State Uni- 
versity of New York at Brockport; M.S. 1980, 
Cornell University. Major: microbiology. 
Mineola, New York 

Janet Braam, B.S. 1980, Southern Illinois. Major: 
biology. Chicago, Illinois 

Lynn A. Brennan, B.A. 1974, Rutgers University. 
Major: biology. New York, New York 



Register 47 



Richard J. Bridges, A.S. 1975, Santa Rosa Junior 
College; B.S. 1977, University of California at 
Davis. Major: biochemistry. Santa Rosa, 
California 

David Brodeur, B.S. 1979, College of William 
and Mary. Major: biochemistry. Brooklyn, 
New York 

James A. Burke, B.A. 1975, Gettysburg College; 
M.S. 1977, Adelphi University. Major: phar- 
macology. Garden City, New York 

Jacqueline P. Burns, B.S. 1978, Marymount 
Manhattan College. Major: biology. New York, 
New York 

Ann M. Carroll, B.S. 1977, St. John's University. 

Major: biology. Williston Park, New York 
Marion Man-Ying Chan, B.S. 1975, M.S. 1978, 

University of Maryland. Major: biology. Hong 

Kong 

*Tsing-Ping Chang, B.S. 1972, Fu-Jen Catholic 
University (Taiwan); M.S. 1976, Fordham Uni- 
versity. Major: biology. Taipei, Taiwan 

Edward Chaum, B.A. 1979, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Major: genetics. Los Angeles, 
California 

Chun-Chang Chen, B.S. 1977, Taiwan University. 

Major: biochemistry. Taipei, Taiwan 
Yung-Wu Chen, B.S. 1972, M.S. 1976, National 

Taiwan University. Major: microbiology. 

Changhua, Taiwan 
Margaret K. Cheung, B.S. 1978, University of 

Michigan. Major: biology. Hong Kong 
Michael J. Chorney, B.S. 1975, M.S. 1977, Lehigh 

University. Major: genetics. Allentown, 

Pennsylvania 
Janet Wing Choy, A.B. 1977, Smith College. 

Major: biological structure and cell biology. 

Wayne, New Jersey 
Clemencia Colmenares, B.S. 1976, Yale Univer- 
sity. Major: biology. Bogota, Columbia 
Joseph M. Colacino, B.A. 1375, University of 

Connecticut; M.S. 1979, Southern Connecticut 

State College. Major: biology. New Haven, 

Connecticut 

Peter S. Conti, B.A. 1978, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. Major: biophysics. Yonkers, New York 

Carlos B. Cordon-Cardo, M.D. 1980, Auton- 
omous University (Spain). Major: pathology. 
Calella, Spain 

Jayne S. Danska, B.A. 1977, Kenyon College. 
Major: genetics. Roslyn Heights, New York 

George N. Davatelis, B.A. 1977, Montclair State 
College; M.S. 1979, University of Hawaii. 
Major: genetics. Paterson, New Jersey 

Margaret Devaney, B.S., B.A. 1977, University of 
Pennsylvania. Major: microbiology. Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania 

Eugene A. DiPaola, B.S. 1974, Manhattan Col- 
lege. Major: genetics. Boston, Massachusetts 

Vladimir V. Drozdoff, B.A. 1979, Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Major: biophysics. Cooper, Maine 

D. Louise Edwards, A.B. 1974, Mount Holyoke 
College. Major: neurobiology and behavior. 
Corning, New York 

* Leave of absence 



Joseph A. Fedrick, B.A. 1973, New York Univer- 
sity. Major: microbiology. Bronx, New York 

Tiyi R. Freeman, B.S. 1970, Cheyney State Col- 
lege; M.D. 1974, Jefferson Memorial College. 
Major: biology. Bronx, New York 

Stephen J. Gardell, B.S. 1977, Boston College. 
Major: biochemistry. Stamford, Connecticut 

Garland J. Garrisi, B.A. 1977, Colgate University; 
M.S. 1979, Boston College. Major: biology. 
Detroit, Michigan 

Daniela S. Gerhard, B.A. 1976, Barnard College. 
Major: biochemistry, Flushing, New York 

Jamshid Ghajar, B.A. 1973, M.A. 1975, University 
of California at Los Angeles. Major: neuro- 
biology and behavior. Los Angeles, California 

Steven M. Grassl, B.S. 1974, Dickinson College; 
M.S. 1979, Rutgers University. Major: physiol- 
ogy. East Lansing, Michigan 

William Nathan Green, B.Sc. 1978, University of 
Toronto. Major: physiology. Buffalo, New York 

Joanna L. Groden, B.A. 1978, Middlebury Col- 
lege. Major: genetics. Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts 

John L. Hall, B.A. 1976, Sarah Lawrence College. 
Major: biological structure and cell biology. 
Princeton, New Jersey 

John M. Harris, B.S. 1980, University of Cali- 
fornia. Major: pharmacology. La Grange, 
Illinois 

Paul E. Harris, A.B. 1978, University of Cali- 
fornia. Major: biology. Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

Linda J. Hartley, B.S. 1973, Fordham University. 
Major: biology. Schenectady, New York 

Howard C. Haspel, B.S. 1978, Polytechnic 
Institute of New York. Major: biochemistry. 
Brooklyn, New York 

Ruth E. Herz, B.S. 1959, Brooklyn College. 
Major: biochemistry. New York, New York 

Lois M. Hinman, B.S. 1969, Simmons College. 
Major: biochemistry. New Haven, Connecticut 

Marquis Z. Hodes, A.B. 1973, Indiana University 
at Bloomington; M.S. 1976, Indiana University 
at Indianapolis. Major: biology. Indianapolis. 
Indiana 

Miranda J. Hughes, B.S. 1978, State University 
of New York. Major: pharmacology. Sydney, 
Australia 

Sally T. Ishizaka, B.A. 1976, Wellesley College. 
Major: biology. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Rae J. Jacobs, B.S. 1975, Rutgers University; 
R.N. 1960, Bellevue School of Nursing. Major: 
biology. New York, New York 

Gajin Jeong, B.S. 1976, M.S. 1978, Seoul Na- 
tional University. Major: biology. Daejeon, 
Korea 

Deborah S. Kaseman, B.S. 1978, North Dakota 
State University. Major: biochemistry. Ashley, 
North Dakota 

Deborah Klein, B.A. 1973, New York University; 
M.S. 1978, Fordham University. Major: genet- 
ics. Teaneck, New Jersey 



48 Register 



Renate F. Klein, B.A. 1977, New York University. 
Major: pathology. Munich, West Germany 

Elena M. Kozak, B.S. 1976, Jacksonville Univer- 
sity. Major: biochemistry. Jacksonville, 
Florida 

Robert W. Kozak, B.S. 1975, Eckerd College. 
Major: microbiology. New York, New York 

William T. L. Lee, B.A. 1978, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Major: genetics. Charlotte, North 
Carolina 

Lynne Lederman, B.S. 1971, State University of 
New York at Stony Brook; M.S. 1974, Cornell 
University. Major: biology. New York, New 
York 

Renee Le Strange, B.A. 1978, University of North 
Carolina. Major: biology. Long Branch, New 
Jersey 

Richard B. Levene, B.S. 1972, Tulane University; 
M.A. 1980, State University of New York. 
Major: physiology. New York, New York 

Sulamita Levine, M.D. 1975, M.S. 1980, Univer- 
sity of Zulia Medical School (Venezuela). 
Major: neurobiology and behavior. Maracaibo, 
Venezuela 

Lucy Tung-Ching Li, B.S. 1973, Cornell Univer- 
sity; M.S. 1979, New York University. Major: 
biology. New York, New York 

Yen Li, B.Sc. 1970, National Taiwan Normal Uni- 
versity; M.S. 1975, State University of New 
York. Major: biochemistry. Taipei, Taiwan 

Geoffrey S. F. Ling, B.A. 1977, Washington 
University. Major: pharmacology. Flemington, 
New Jersey 

Stanley Lipkowitz, B.A. 1977, Cornell University. 

Major: biochemistry. Ferndale, New York 
Elaine Louie, B.S. 1974, Brooklyn College. 

Major: genetics. New York, New York 
Humberto Jose Martinez, M.D. 1975, University 

of Zulia Medical School (Venezuela). Major: 

neurobiology and behavior. Maracaibo, 

Venezuela 

John R. Matyas, A.B. 1978, Cornell University. 
Major: biological structure and cell biology. 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

David H. Maurer, A.B. 1977, Cornell University. 
Major: biology. Newburgh, New York 

John P. McGrath, B.S. 1977, University of Scran- 
ton. Major: biochemistry. Scranton, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Richard W. Michitsch, B.A. 1975, M.S. 1978, New 
York University. Major: biology. Brooklyn, 
New York 

Carol A. Mirenda, B.A. 1979, Rutgers University. 
Major: biology. Englewood, New Jersey 

Kate T. Montgomery, B.A. 1978, Vassar College. 
Major: biology. Chappaqua, New York 

David Brian Musket, B.A. 1980, Boston College. 
Major: neurobiology and behavior. Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island 

Dennis C. Mynarcik, B.S. 1978, University of 
Texas at San Antonio. Major: biochemistry. 
San Antonio, Texas 

Dean H. Nakamura, B.S. 1974, M.S. 1977, Uni- 



versity of Hawaii. Major: genetics. Honolulu, 
Hawaii 

Barbara T. Nash, B.S. 1972, City University of 
New York; M.S. 1974, Yale University. Major: 
biochemistry. Larchmont, New York 

Elizabeth W. Newcomb, B.S. 1966, University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst; M.S. 1971, Kansas 
State University. Major: genetics. New York, 
New York 

Margaret E. Nichols, A.I.M.L.S. 1962, Sir John 
Cass College (England); F.I.M.L.S. 1964, Mid 
Essex College (England). Major: genetics. 
England 

Deborah G. Owen, B.S. 1974, University of 
Louisville. Major: microbiology. Louisville, 
Kentucky 

Roger N. Pearse, B.A. 1977, Dartmouth College. 

Major: pathology. Newport, Rhode Island 
Andrea M. Powell, B.A. 1978, Manhattanville 

College. Major: pharmacology. New Rochelle, 

New York 

Rebecca Rico-Hesse, B.S. 1978, University of 
Nebraska; M.P.H. 1980, University of Minne- 
sota. Major: microbiology. Los Angeles, 
California 

Richard J. Riley, B.S. 1972, Manhattan College; 
M.S. 1976, New York University. Major: radio- 
logical physics. Yonkers, New York 

Joseph A. Rokovich, B.S. 1976, M.S. 1978, 
California State College. Major: pathology. 
New Eagle, Pennsylvania 

Christopher A. Ross, A.B. 1974, Princeton Uni- 
versity. Major: neurobiology and behavior. 
New York, New York 

M. Elizabeth Ross, B.A. 1975, State University of 
New York at Binghamton; M.D. 1980, Cornell 
University. Major: neurobiology and behavior. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Margery J. Ross, B.A. 1973, University of Cali- 
fornia at San Diego. Major: biology. Salinas, 
California 

Robert Rothlein, B.A. 1972, University of Ver- 
mont; M.S. 1978, University of Minnesota. 
Major: biology. New York, New York 

Charles D. Rosenberg, A.B. 1978, Washington 
University; M.S. 1979, State University of New 
York at Buffalo. Major: pathology. Merrick, 
New York 

Linda M. Roux, S.B. 1978, Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. Major: biology. Los 
Angeles, California 

Stephen D. Rubino, B.S. 1980, Mulhenberg 
College. Major: microbiology. Harrison, New 
York 

John R. Sadlik, B.S. 1973, St. John's University. 
Major: biology. New York, New York 

Kathleen V. Scotto, B.S. 1977, St. John's Uni- 
versity. Major: biology. Queens, New York 

Emilia M. Sordillo, A.B. 1976, Harvard University; 
M.D. 1980, Cornell University. Major: biology. 
New York, New York 

Mary K. Spiegel, B.S. 1978, Duke University. 
Major: pharmacology. Knoxville, Tennessee 



Register 49 



Doris R. Stanick, B.S. 1975, College of Mt. St. 
Vincent. Major: microbiology. Glendale, New 
York 

Jeffrey S. Sprouse, B.A. 1975, University of 
Delaware; M.S. 1977, Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. Major: pharmacology. Wilmington, 
Delaware 

Robert J. Storella, B.A. 1978, Wesleyan Univer- 
sity. Major: pharmacology. Brighton, Massa- 
chusetts 

Jeffrey A. Stuckey, B.S. 1977, Butler University. 
Major: neurobiology and behavior. Lima, Ohio 

Erika F. Sutanto, B.S. 1977, Polytechnic Insti- 
tute of New York. Major: genetics. The 
Netherlands 

Alexandra Swiecicki, B.S. 1978, Cornell Univer- 
sity. Major: microbiology. Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

Colleen Taylor, B.S. 1980, Siena College. Major: 
microbiology. Newark, New Jersey 

G. Peter Todd, B.S. 1977, Utah State University. 
Major: biochemistry, Washington, D.C. 

Jason G. Umans, B.S. 1976, Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute. Major: pharmacology. 
Cedarhurst, New York 

John E. Van Hamont, B.A. 1972, St. Anselm's 
College; M.S. 1976, Long Island University. 
Major: microbiology. Brooklyn, New York 

David Wallace, B.S. 1966, City University of New 
York. Major: microbiology. New York, New 
York 

Pasquale B. Zanzonico, B.S. 1977, Cooper 
Union School of Engineering and Science. 
Major: biophysics. Brooklyn, New York 



Candidate for the Degree of Master of Science 

Leslie A. Seiden, B.A. 1978, City University of 
New York. Major: patholoyy. New York, New 
York 

Note. A complete listing of students' sponsors 
and research topics can be found in the 
Graduate School Office. 

Entering Students, 1981 

Philip Alcabes, B.S. 1976, Union College; M.A. 
1978, University of California at Berkeley; 
M.P.H. 1981, Columbia University. Major: 
pathology. New York, New York 

Leang-Mei Lin Chen, B.S. 1965, National Taiwan 
Norma! University; M.S. 1969, National Tai- 
wan University. Major: biochemistry. Taiwan 

Ughetta del Balzo Hachfeld, B.A. 1981, Barnard 
College. Major: physiology. Rome, Italy 

Lynn Anne Doucette, B.Sc. 1981, McMaster Uni- 



versity (Canada). Major: genetics. Toronto, 
Canada 

Steven Einheber, B.S. 1981, George Washington 
University. Major: biological structure and 
cell biology. Washington, D.C. 

Ellen V. Gudewill, B.S. 1979, State University of 
New York at Stony Brook. Major, pathology. 
Wurzburg, West Germany 

Gregory R. Gummere, B.A. 1979, M.S. 1981, 
University of Cincinnati. Major: genetics and 
molecular biology. Cincinnati, Ohio 

Robert J. Hariri, B.A. 1980, Columbia College. 
Major: pathology. Forest Hills, New York 

Ivan Boris John, B.S. 1981 , City University of 
New York. Major: microbiology. Trinidad 

Catherine D. Kelly, B.A. 1981, State University of 
New York at Purchase. Major: microbiology. 
Rockville Center, New York 

Eric Scott Lader, B.S. 1981, Brooklyn College. 
Major: genetics. Brooklyn, New York 

Cherie Lindahl, B.S. 1981, Columbia University. 
Major: pathology. Chicago, Illinois 

Stephen Harold Lockhart, A.B. 1977, Wash- 
ington University; M. Phil. 1979, Oxford 
University (England). Major: biostatistics. 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Thomas C. Lufkin, A.B. 1981, University of Cali- 
fornia, Berkeley. Major: cell biology. Birming- 
ham, Michigan 

Rene Paul Manzo, B.A. 1981, State University of 
New York at Purchase. Major: biological 
structure and cell biology. New York, New 
York 

Corinne A. Mitchell, B.S. 1981, Marymount Col- 
lege. Major: genetics. Poughkeepsie, New 
York 

Christine Peterson, B.S. 1976, Herbert H. Leh- 
man College; M.A. 1978, University of Cali- 
fornia, Santa Barbara. Major: neurobiology 
and behavior. Bronx, New York 

Donna A. Robertson, B.S. 1979, Syracuse Univer- 
sity. Major: pharmacology. White Plains, 
New York 

James E. Ruether, B.A. 1981, University of 
Colorado. Major: genetics and molecular 
biology. Albany, New York 

Rose Mary Shaffer, B.S. 1980, Loyola College. 
Major: microbiology. Baltimore, Maryland 

Paul Stanley Stinavage, A.A.S. 1977, State Uni- 
versity of New York at Morrisville; B.S. 
1981, Marywood College. Major: microbiology. 
Susquehanna, Pennsylvania 

Jeffrey K. Teumer, B.A. 1979, Colgate University. 
Major: cell biology. Sheboygan, Wisconsin 

Mark Underwood, B.A. 1981, University of Ver- 
mont. Major: neurobiology and behavior. St. 
Albans, Vermont 

Steven M. Weisman, B.S., B.A. 1981, Fairleigh 
Dickinson University. Major: pharmacology. 
Kansas City, Missouri 



Cornell University Medical College 

1. Stavros S. Niarchos 
Medical Research Building 

a. The William Randolph Hearst 
Microbiology Research Building 

2. William Hale Harkness 
Medical Research Building 

3. Samuel J. Wood Library 
and Research Building 

4. Biochemistry Pharmacology 
Building 

5. Olin Hall Admissions 
Office 

6. Livingston Farrand 
Apartments 




7. Kipps Bay Building 

8. Lasdon House 



Memorial Sloan Kettering 
Cancer Center 

13. Elmer and Mamdouha Bobst 
Medical Sciences Building 

14. Memorial Hospital 

15. Sloan House 

16. Winston House 
Sloan-Kettering Institute 

17. Kettering Laboratory 

18. Howard Laboratory 

19. Arnold and Marie Schwartz 
Hall of Science 

20. Rockefeller University 

21. Hospital for Special Surgery 



The New York Hospital 

9. The New York Hospital 

10. Payne Whitney 
Psychiatry Clinic 

11. "S" Building 

12. Payson House 





Index 



Admission, 6 

Announcements, list of, 52. 
Biochemistry, 13; 25 

Biological Structure and Cell Biology, 14; 29 
Biophysics, 26 
Biostatistics, 28 

Calendar, 2 

Courses: Interdivisional, 35, Medical College 
Division, 13, Sloan-Kettering Division, 25 

Degree Requirements, 7 

Examinations, 9 
Expenses, 9 

Facilities: Medical College Division, 5 

Sloan-Kettering Division, 5 
Faculty, 38 

Financial assistance, 10 

Foreign language requirements, 9 

General Committee of the School, 6 
Genetics, 16; 30 
Grades, 7 

Health services and medical care, 11 
Housing, 12 

Immunology, 32 



Major and minor fields, 7 
M.D.-Ph.D. program, 36 
Microbiology, 17 
Molecular Biology, 30 

Neurobiology and Behavior, 19 

Pathology, 20 
Pharmacology, 21 
Pharmacology and Experimental 

Therapeutics, 34 
Ph.D.-M.D. program, 36 
Physiology, 23 
Prizes, 10 

Provisional candidates, 6 
Registration, 7 

Requirements: degree, 7, residence, 7 
Residence halls, 12 

Scholarships and awards, 10 
Special Committee, 7 
Special programs, 36 
Special students, 7 
Students, register of, 46 
Study in absentia, 8 

Theses, 9 

Transfer of residence credit, 8 
Tuition and fees, 9 



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ILR Cornell 

Graduate Study at ILR 
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Medical College (New York City) 



Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

(New York City) 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 

New York State College of Veterinary Medicine 

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designed to give prospective students pertinent 
information about all aspects and academic 
units of the University 

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the University publishes a master catalog of 
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a handbook for enrolled students, Academic 
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